Great Expectations

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Leila Siddique
MGT707
9/9/10
Great Expectations

I. Introduction
Mr. Y. Hiraki is construction chief of International Urasa Consulting Engineers Company Limited of Japan (IUCEJ), currently working in Nepal. Culture differences and unstipulated work assignments have created tension between the cultures, and deterioration in the IUCEJ’s authority. Hiraki tries to balance his duties and roles, all the while keeping with his values. Conflict arises between he and his subordinates, and if not handles, he may risk losing his job.

II. Issues and Theories
a. Jobs and tasks are not being completed
i. Role Overload and Role Conflict
Hiraki has role overload when he is given more responsibilities and job requirements than he originally agreed to when taking the job. Too much is expected from him and he is unable to complete his primary task. ii. FIRO-B Theory

Hiraki and his counterpart engineers have trouble relating to each other because they have different needs and expectations from their work. The group’s effort is wasted on interpersonal conflicts. b. Cultural differences create a divide between the Japanese and Nepalese workers iii. Importing Societal Subgroups

Differing values and job assumptions created a ‘clash of cultures’ between the Japanese and the Nepalese workers. Hiraki and the Japanese workers created a subdominant counterculture that was forced to work within the Nepalese social system. iv. GLOBE Theoretical Model

Japan and Nepal have different societal culture norms, which entail different views of what an effective leader and worker should behave like. Hiraki’s cold leadership style is rejected by the counterpart engineers, who prefer a relaxed work atmosphere, which is in turn seen as lazy to Hiraki. c. IUCEJ Authority has no power or respect from the Nepalese workers v. Acceptance of Authority

The counterpart engineers do not accept the IUCEJ as...
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