Gravity and Its Benefits

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What is gravity?
Gravity is a force pulling together all matter (which is anything you can physically touch). The more matter, the more gravity, so things that have a lot of matter such as planets and moons and stars pull more strongly. Mass is how we measure the amount of matter in something. The more massive something is, the more of a gravitational pull it exerts. As we walk on the surface of the Earth, it pulls on us, and we pull back. But since the Earth is so much more massive than we are, the pull from us is not strong enough to move the Earth, while the pull from the Earth can make us fall flat on our faces. In addition to depending on the amount of mass, gravity also depends on how far you are from something. This is why we are stuck to the surface of the Earth instead of being pulled off into the Sun, which has many more times the gravity of the Earth. Gravity is a very important and critical ay lives and you probably don't even notice. Here are some things that gravity does for us evey:     Gravity brings us back down to the ground when we jump up. It stops us from floWhat is the importance of gravity? * ating into space.

* Gravity keeps our food on our plates and our drinks in our glasses. * Gravity keeps the Earth in orbit around the sun and keeps us warm. It is the universal force of attraction that acts between all bodies that have mass.

Though it is the weakest of the four known forces, it shapes the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the entire universe. The laws of gravity describe the trajectories of bodies in the solar system and the motion of objects on Earth, where all bodies experience a downward gravitational force exerted by Earth's mass, the force experienced as weight. Isaac Newton was the first to develop a quantitative theory of gravitation, holding that the force of attraction between two bodies is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance...
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