Grass Fairy

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Grass Fairy
I am a soccer player. Soccer is and forever will be a favorite sport of mine. Unfortunately, this wonderful sport is not as accepted in America as it is in other parts of the world, like Europe. As a result of the lack of interest in the game of soccer, some people don’t refer to me as a soccer player, but a grass fairy.

The term grass fairy is used to describe soccer players, most commonly by Americans, or people who don’t admire the game. It is meant to be an insult to anyone who plays soccer, inferring that the sport weak, un-lively, and not a contact sport like football or hockey. It is quite blatant how the grass in grass fairy got there, considering the sport is played on a grass field, but fairy tells a different story. The way a soccer player runs down the field dribbling the ball, or performing moves is compared to that of a dancing, flying, or frolicking fairy. The Urban Dictionary describes it as “somebody who plays soccer, or somebody who thinks soccer is better than football.” Even though these words are meant to be insulting, I handle it like a compliment.

I have always been instructed that the best way to bargain with something negative is to cope with it, and turn it into a positive. I used to visualize this word as offensive to me, and players and admirers all around. Kids who played other sports tended to be under the opinion that theirs was more athletic, more resilient than soccer. It was almost to the point where I was embarrassed to confess my admiration for the game if somebody ever asked me, in fearfulness of being called a grass fairy. Thankfully, I can say that those days are days of the past. Being referred to as a grass fairy is no longer humiliating, but a compliment in a way. Considering that the definition is partially someone who plays soccer, I have acknowledged that that is exactly how I should prospect it. It is simply just a synonym for a soccer player.

At first, it was difficult to get used to not...
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