Graphic Design 1920

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Masters of Design (Communication Design) program Graduate Diploma of Design (Communication Design) program

Unit Code: HDCD640 From Print to Screen: a History of Visual Communication Design Assessment Task Cover Sheet

Assessment Task: Case Study 1. Primary Sources Submission Date: 9 April, 2012. 9AM Submit via Blackboard Group Discussion Forum. A separate Forum will be set up titled Assessment Task 1

Assessment Task Comments: If needed, add any comments you wish to make to the assessor about this assessment task. Participant Declaration: I hereby declare that the work submitted for this assessment task is my original work, and I have not plagiarised any of it (as defined by Swinburne University in the Unit of Study Outline). [By adding your name to this form, you are agreeing to the above statement]. Participant Name: Stephanie Prats Abreu Participant Number (Student Number): 7454295

Grading Matrix (to be completed by assessor) Mark Allocation Section Pass Credit Distinction High Distinction

Final Grade Comments

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In the 20th century the profession of graphic design was establish with industrialization creating new and modern ideas to offer the world different perspectives and impact people’s lives. Art was no longer just art. It became something commercial that was used to advertise products and ideas (Aynsley, J.). Art deco posters came in time when mass consumerism and production were new and exciting to society, spreading around the world during the wartime and changing people’s perspectives of life, everything was advertise, from theatre, to cruises, alcohol and cigarettes, everything that could be sold was a subject to an Art Deco poster. (Decolish, 2012) In this essay I will be describing and analysing a couple of travel posters from this decade. The first one was created by Cassandre and is called “The Normandie” and the second one was designed by Sellheim and its name is “Australia Surf Club”.

The Normandie Adolphe Jean Marie Mouron, or best known as Cassandre, was born in Knarkov-Ukraine on the 24th of January 1901. He was a painter, typeface designer and poster artist very recognized during the 1930’s. Cassandre attended the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris and became very popular by creating innovating posters that lead him to work in a printing house in Paris called Hachard until 1922. Then he decided to co-found one of the world’s first specific advertising and design agencies called Alliance Graphique and became very popular in Europe and the US during the 1930’s. To describe more about Cassandre and his advertising work, I have chosen to describe and analyse one of his most famous posters called “The Normandie” created in 1935, using lithograph as the printing technique, to advertise the French fastest and largest passenger ship afloat built at the time that would take passenger from France to the US and vice versa (Grace, 2009). The Normandie was an amazing creation for the time. It was one of the marvels of human design and architecture that represented the value of the society. This was a masterpiece of technological achievement and modern design (O’Toole, R.). This is the reason why Cassandre was chosen to make the propaganda poster for this magnificent cruise liner during the interwar period. With this fantastic art deco poster, Cassandre focused on the Normandie as a triumph of modern technology, creating a new way of selling excitement and glamour of ocean liner travel to the American and Western public. A new era of transatlantic travel was being inaugurated,

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setting new standards of speed, safety and luxury. This poster celebrates the prosperous new lifestyle of the 1930’s and the new ways of luxury transport in this modern era. The design of this poster is fairly simple aesthetically, but with a great visual impact that accentuates the elegance of graphic design and of the ship itself. It had great effect on the public accomplishing its purpose of communicating a...
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