Grapes of Wrath

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 8
  • Published : February 24, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Deep reading is a style of reading where one sits and obtains a truer understanding of the implied meanings of a book. So much of reading today is done in a very quick or jumpy kind of style where one will jump from one text to another never fully digesting what she is reading. In other words, with so much reading being done from the internet people are reading snippets and headlines that give them a gist of an article or work instead of sitting with a book and really digesting, re-reading, and looking for the meaning of the author’s words. In The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck, the reader must read deeply to appreciate the piece of writing and to comprehend it as Steinbeck intended it to be understood.

In Chapter 7, the reader learns about sales between a salesman and a farmers. Steinbeck writes, “Yes, sir. ’22 Dogde. Best goddamn car Dogde ever made. Never wear out. Low compression. High compression got lots a sap for a while, but the metal ain’t made that’ll hold it for long. Plymouth, Rocknes, Stars.” (Steinbeck 62) This interchapter delievers monologue that shows the communication between a salesman and a tenant farmer. The speed and confidence projected through the salesman’s voice is an element that contributes to manipulating the farmers to buy these cars. In this chapter, the salesmen would pressure the farmers into buying cars. The farmers were desperate to buy a car in order to be westward, and the saklesmen jnew that, thus maniulate the farmers to buy cars for horrible deals. The salesmen filled the cars with saw dust to cover up noises the cars would make. Also, when a farmer purchased a car, the salesman would chane the new battery with a broken battery.
tracking img