Gp Answer Paper of a Level

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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE LOCAL EXAMINATIONS SYNDICATE Joint Examination for the Higher School Certificate and General Certificate of Education

Additional materials: Answer paper

8001/1, 2
2 hours 40 minutes


2 hours 40 minutes

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Write your name, Centre number, candidate number and paper number (1 or 2) in the spaces provided on the answer paper/answer booklet. Answer two questions. Answer one question from Paper 1 and one question from Paper 2. Write your answers on the answer paper. Begin your answer to Paper 2 on a new and separate sheet of paper. At the end of the examination, hand in your answers to Paper 1 and Paper 2 separately. If you are unable to answer a question in any one Paper, send in a blank sheet giving your name, Centre number, candidate number and the number of that Paper. INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES In Paper 1, all questions carry equal marks. In Paper 2, the number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question. The total time of 2 hours and 40 minutes includes ten minutes for you to study the questions before you begin your answers. You may make notes during this time if you wish. You are advised to spend no longer than 1 hour 15 minutes on Paper 1. You should write between 500 and 800 words. INSTRUCTIONS TO SUPERVISORS You are requested to place the answers belonging to the two papers in separate envelopes which should be marked 1 or 2.

This question paper consists of 7 printed pages and 1 blank page. SP (NF) S14170/1 © UCLES 2001

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3 Paper 1


Does one country ever have the right to influence the internal affairs of another?


Is it more important to deal with the causes of crime than its punishment?


Is terrorist action ever justified?


Can countries with a history of conflict achieve real peace and trust?


‘A family with no children is not a family at all.’ Discuss.


‘The environment is being harmed more by human activity than natural disasters.’ Do you agree?


Would education be improved if it took place at home by means of modern technology?


What are the attractions and dangers of trying to predict future events and developments?


Does sport do more to encourage international rivalry than to overcome it?

10 ‘The camera can never lie.’ Is this true?

11 ‘Media celebrities are over-rated and over-paid.’ Do you agree?

12 ‘Science fiction is simply fantasy and escapism.’ Discuss.


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4 Paper 2 13 Read the following passage, which was written in December 1998, and then answer all the questions below. As the 20th century draws to a close, does science stand at the beginning of an epic period or at the end? Research over the past 100 years has roamed across an extraordinary variety of frontiers: space exploration; the computer revolution; widespread vaccination; the first heart-transplant operation; air travel; test-tube babies; the atomic bomb; genetically engineered foods available in supermarkets; unravelling the structure of DNA. Some doubters, therefore, argue that the 21st century will not deliver similarly profound advances because the golden age of discovery is over. Their view is that the fundamentals of science have been mastered. The Big Bang theory tells us how the Universe started; we now understand DNA, the code of life; technologists are close to creating a robot as intelligent as any human being. Others, however, argue that the astounding achievements of the past century do not spell the end of science. Rather, they will do one of two things – pave the way for future glories or crumble in the face of further evidence, giving rise to completely new theories. One example of the former is space exploration – without the Moon landings, we wouldn’t have the International Space Station, on...
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