Government Issues

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The 1992 president election of Governor William Clinton and President George Bush was a prime example of what issues can affect the outcome of a president election. The position and valence issues took a major toll on both of these opponents declaring Clinton as the 1992 election winner. Although the Republican Party was fairly strong during the term of President Bush the tax issue caused a near down fall, which caused the Democratic Party to bring in a new face. The first issue that had affected the Clinton and Bush election through a valence outlook would be the decline from the economy. The 1992 election was more of “economy election”, meaning that most of the issues faced were about the economy of the United States. Take for instance, many people in the early 90s felt as though the economy was beginning to drop and decided to vote for Clinton, who was a new face with great potential, instead of the incumbent President Bush who had recently raised taxes and was being what most Americans were calling the “cause of the decline in the economy”. Although position issues was not a enormous part of the 1992 election, Clintons name was slandered by supposedly past marital affairs and marijuana smoking but, the issues that he was concerned about was much more important to the American people. One of the top position issues displayed in this election from Clinton’s standpoint was welfare issues. The 1992 election took a dramatic rise in Clintons vote on this position issue by giving the American people what they wanted, more jobs and a person who actually cared about what the poor wanted in life.

Presidential campaigns always involve position and valence issues that affect the nation, the incumbent and the opponent in varies aspects. The 1992 election is a prime example of the two government terms, which in the end declared William Clinton the new president of the United States.
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