Government Enforced Cyber Security, a Public Good?

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Government enforced Cyber Security;
A public good?

Table of Contents

What is a Public Good?3
Is Enforcement of Cyber Security a Public Good?4
Should government enforce cyber security in the private sector?5 What would be the impact of government enforced cyber security in the private sector?5 Should private industry have the responsibility to protect national security?5 Summary6

References:7

What is a Public Good?

We all know that cyber security is something of great importance to anyone trying to protect their network assets, customer assets, and personal assets. The list of possible risks associated with neglecting to practice good cyber security are endless, and the dangers lurking out in cyber space too numerous to imagine anyone who is controlling any type of company network to ignore; but the question here is whether or not the government should become the cyber security enforcer not only within in its own government sector but also within the private sector as well as a public good. Before we get into the discussion of whether or not the government should play this role, I believe we should have a short discussion on what “public good” actually means. Generally speaking “public good” is a loose term used to justify some kind of action one is taking, by saying that it is in the best interest of the general population to do so. The implications behind the use of the term “public good” is that #1 the action is beneficial to a majority of the population; and #2 that the majority of the population is either too ignorant, or incapable for some reason of performing the action for themselves. The use of the term is also handy because it is non-specific as to WHO is actually benefiting from the actions; is it the general consumer, the small businesses, big businesses, the government, a special interest group, all of the above, none of the above, Who? Who is actually benefiting from the act? By using the term the “public good” one does not have to account for who is actually benefiting. Nor do they have to identify who might be harmed or negatively affected by the action either. Additionally by using the term that it is for the “public good”, by default the concept of how much will it cost, and who is going to pay for it, is seemingly automatically a non-concern. So by the very nature of the term for “the public good” the user of said term has attempted to write themselves a blank check, quantifying and justifying any and all actions they mean to implement and enforce. The term “public good” has been used by various entities throughout history to accomplish some of the most horrendous crimes against their people, and to extort unimaginable amounts of wealth and goods from their populations. Anytime the term “public good” is used to ask for justification for an action from any entity it should be immediately critically examined with a very find tooth comb to find what the motivations for such a kind gesture might be, as well as analyzed by a staunch accountant to find out where the money is, and where it leads in the proposition. The term “public good” more than any other term I can think of, is more often than not the very term used to lead more sheep to their own quiet slaughter then any war cry ever has. It should always be approached with skeptism and caution when used, especially in conjunction with the word government.

Is Enforcement of Cyber Security a Public Good?

Should the enforcement of cyber security be considered a “public good”? This is a very difficult question to answer. In theory, on the surface, enforcement of cyber security seems like it might be a very viable public service. As viable as other protections offered as a public good such as the services of military and police protections. But then you begin to look a little deeper into the subject and you realize that enforcement of cyber security protections has many more...
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