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The Gothic Themes Of The House Of Seven Gables

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The Gothic Themes Of The House Of Seven Gables

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Outline of Gothic Themes of The House of The Seven Gables Thesis Statement: Nathaniel Hawthorne's The House of The Seven Gables can be best appreciated for gothic themes of revenge, pride, and romance.

I. Life of Nathaniel Hawthorne A. Life B. Thesis Statement II. Revenge A. Between the Judge and Clifford B. Between Matthew Maule and Colonial Pyncheon III. Pride A. The pride of the Pyncheon family.

B. The pride of Hepzibah for her family name.

IV. Romance A. Between Phoebe Pyncheon and Clifford V. Conclusion A. Thesis Statement B. Review Nathaniel Hawthorne was born July 4, 1804, in Salem, Massachusetts. He was a descendent of early Puritan settlers, which had a great influence on his life and writings. When he graduated from Bowdoin College he published his first novel, anonymously, a gothic romance Fanshawe in 1828. The next ten years Hawthorne collected his stories and published them as Twice Told Tales in 1837. In 1841 he moved into Brook Farm Community which was a transcendentalist group living. Hawthorne married Sophia Peabody in Boston July 9, 1842. After Mosses from an Old Manse in 1846 he couldn't support himself. In 1850 he published The Scarlet Letter and in 1851 The House of the Seven Gables and in 1852 The Blithedale Romance which made more then enough money for him and his wife and was the peak of his literary career. Nathaniel Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables can be best appreciated for gothic themes of revenge, pride, and romance.

Revenge is one of the gothic themes in The House of the Seven Gables. It is expressed between the Judge and Clifford in later years but starts with Matthew Maule's plan for revenge by cursing the Colonial Pyncheon and all further generations of the Pyncheons. "God", said the dying man, pointing his finger, with a ghostly look, at the undismayed continence of his enemy "God will give him blood to drink" (Hawthorne 3). The Colonial Pyncheon suddenly died in his home after shortly building it on...