Google vs. Monopoly

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Google vs. Monopoly
Content

Introduction………………………………………………………………………….............................................2

Long Journey To Victory .…………………………………………………………………………………………………..…..2

Evil Monopoly …………….………………….….……………….…………………….……………………………………………..3

Conclusion……………………………….………………….………............................................................4

References…………………………………………….……………...........................................................6

Google vs. Monopoly

Introduction
When running a large system of goods or services which millions of people follow, it is obvious there will be ones who will be jealous of such a system and who will try to prevent or break this system by any means whether it involves cheating or not. In this case, Google is the big system who was accused of using its commanding position in Web search to hurt rival companies and leverage its travel services, restaurant reviews and other product.

Long Journey To Victory
In a free market, suppliers compete with others in order to achieve more consumers. Each supplier presents products at prices that more consumers prefer. This is the intense competition between businesses since “satisfaction of human beings” is the number one goal of each business. First of all, when there are loads of businesses running towards one goal, it is already intense. Second, “satisfaction of human beings”, this goal itself is nearly impossible to achieve because we are dealing with very moody and emotional creatures. Hence, the competition becomes bizarre. Because of this madness, companies might take on unfair actions where the main goal becomes “possession of the market”. These companies want to be the owners of the owners with no more market share for anyone but themselves. This is why the antitrust laws were ever passed and turned such unfair actions into illegal. Antitrust laws protect anti-competitive behaviors and free-trade. If there is no competition for an existing business, then it could draw off money out of the society and charge any price it wants. In this situation a consumer doesn’t have a choice because the supplies are needed. Not only Google was investigated under the Federal Trade Commission for unfairly restraining free trade but also under the Clayton Act for an anti-competitive behavior which was later found that Google has not violated. Microsoft recently debuted a campaign to discredit Google's shopping feature, warning Americans not to get "scroogled" and instead to try Bing. If Americans do, indeed, feel scroogled one way or another, all they need do is click to another Web site. (Editorial, 2001) Google has long defended its search business, saying that it offers results that are most relevant to consumers and that the "competition is just a click away." (The New York Times, 2010) Good argument. This shows that users who are not satisfies with Google’s search engine are just a ‘click away’ from another one such as Microsoft’s Bing or Yahoo. Basically Google competes without harming anyone. Google has also said that the barriers to entry into the search business are so low that it cannot abuse its market power, even though it has more than a 70-per-cent share of the search business in the U.S. (The New York Times, 2010) As I’ve said before, Google have been accused that it arranges its search results indulging its own growing number of business and marketing sites to appear on top. This includes companies’ websites such as shopping, local listing and travel which are driven by Google’s traffic. This, however, has been resolved by the antitrust lawyers that said: “Anti-competitive behavior cannot be proved simply by showing that a change in the algorithm causes other sites to show up lower in results, even though studies have shown that users rarely look beyond the first page of search results.” (The New York Times, 2010)

This investigation has been going on for almost two years which was a big pressure...
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