Golden Gate Creamery Incorporated

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Golden Gate Creamery Inc.


Golden Gate Creamery Inc. started as a distributor of food products that eventually went into manufacturing and marketing of ice cream. They introduced two ice cream brands in the Filipino market namely, The American Dream and Pistahan. The third brand is up for launch and is still in planning process.

The author of this case study aims to help the company to come up with a good plan and proposal for the said product with the gathered information from the company.

History of Ice cream

The origins of ice cream can be traced back to at least the 4th century B.C. Early references include the Roman emperor Nero (A.D. 37-68) who ordered ice to be brought from the mountains and combined with fruit toppings, and King Tang (A.D. 618-97) of Shang, China who had a method of creating ice and milk concoctions. Ice cream was likely brought from China back to Europe. Over time, recipes for ices, sherbets, and milk ices evolved and served in the fashionable Italian and French royal courts.

the dessert was imported to the United States, it was served by several famous Americans. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson served it to their guests. In 1700, Governor Bladen of Maryland was recorded as having served it to his guests. In 1774, a London caterer named Philip Lenzi announced in a New York newspaper that he would be offering for sale various confections, including ice cream. Dolly Madison served it in 1812.

First Ice Cream Parlor in America - Origins of English Name

The first ice cream parlor in America opened in New York City in 1776. American colonists were the first to use the term "ice cream". The name came from the phrase "iced cream" that was similar to "iced tea". The name was later abbreviated to "ice cream" the name we know today.

Ingredients of Ice cream

Ice cream has the following composition:

• Greater than 10% milkfat by legal definition, and usually between 10% and as high as 16% fat in some premium ice creams • 9 to 12% milk solids-not-fat: this component, also known as the serum solids, contains the proteins (caseins and whey proteins) and carbohydrates (lactose) found in milk • 12 to 16% sweeteners: usually a combination of sucrose and glucose-based corn syrup sweeteners • 0.2 to 0.5% stabilizers and emulsifiers

• 55% to 64% water which comes from the milk or other ingredients

These percentages are by weight, either in the mix or in the frozen ice cream. Please remember, however, that when frozen, about one half of the volume of ice cream is air so by volume in ice cream, these numbers can be reduced by approximately one-half, depending on the actual air content. However, since air does not contribute weight, we usually talk about the composition of ice cream on a weight basis, bearing in mind this important distinction. All ice cream flavors, with the possible exception of chocolate, are made from a basic white mix.

Milk fat or Butterfat

Milk fat or fat in general, including that from non-dairy sources, is important to ice cream for the following reasons: • increases the richness of flavor in ice cream
• produces a characteristic smooth texture by lubricating the palate • helps to give body to the ice cream, due to its role in fat destabilization • aids in good melting properties, also due to its role in fat destabilization • aids in lubricating the freezer barrel during manufacturing (Non-fat mixes are extremely hard on the freezing equipment) The limitations of excessive use of butterfat in a mix include: • cost

• hindered whipping ability
• decreased consumption due to excessive richness
• high caloric value
The best source of butterfat in ice cream for high quality flavor and convenience is fresh sweet cream from fresh sweet milk. Other sources include butter or anhydrous milk fat.
During freezing of ice cream, the fat emulsion which exists in the mix will...
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