Goblin Market

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  • Topic: Christina Rossetti, Goblin Market, Victorian era
  • Pages : 3 (848 words )
  • Download(s) : 135
  • Published : November 25, 2012
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chrSomone Jackson
Mr. Price
English 2223 01
28 October 2012
Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market”
One of the strongest emotions inherent in humans is desire. Christina Rossetti poem “Goblin Market” is filled with many suggestive pieces referring to different kinds of fruits that play upon the hidden desire. From exotic fruit to sweet nectars, she has her audience wondering about her true meaning for the fruit. The question to be answers is what are the “fruits” being offered to the girls?

Many people believed that the poem was directed towards being gay or lesbian just by the vivid language Rossetti used in her poem, but in all actuality that theory was far from being right. During the Victorian period, emphasis was put on ladies to be very conservative. Christine Rossetti’s Goblin Market defies the confinements of the Victorian age while romantically critiquing what takes place in the dark outside of the regality of social circles in relation to forbidden sexuality. In the poem ‘fruit” was referenced many times in relations to the goblin men. In a sense the “fruit” can be related to the old Christian story of Adam and Eve and the forbidden fruit. The forbidden fruit was Eve weakness but was her desire to have it lead to her demise. The context of the fruit in Goblin Market has explicit sexual connotations that lend to an instructive and more importantly, cautioning perspective on sexual activity. From the very first stanza, with its descriptions of luscious fruits for sale in the "Goblin Market," some hard to find but summer ripe, one cannot help but read these mouth-watering depictions with sexuality in mind. Examples of this would be “Plump unpecked cherries” (Rossetti 7) and “Figs to fill your mouth, Citron from the South, Sweet to tongue and sound to eye;” (Rossetti 28-30). The “fruit” mention throughout the poem can be linked to the idea of an addiction. Being that the “fruit” was forbidden “Their offers should not charm us, / Their evil gifts...
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