Goal Selection

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CheckPoint Goal Selection

Matching hypothesis is a theory of interpersonal attraction as proposed by Goffman (1952). It suggests that people are attracted to others who are the same perceived level of attractiveness as themselves. Initially this was based purely on the looks and physical attractiveness, but it had since been suggested that other characteristics such as humor or intelligence can compensate for looks. Studies by Walster (1966) and Walster & Walster (1969) have found evidence for matching when individuals have meet previously and know each other’s background. However if it is the first time the individuals met, the more likely that they will aim for the attention of the most attractive individual, rather than trying to achieve a match. One well matched goal in my life was the goal to go back to school and get degree before I reached fifty years old. That has been a long time goal of mine and in 10 more days I can start the countdown, I have almost made it through my first year successfully, and for that I am truly proud of myself. I have always said that when I get my children through college it would be my turn. My daughter is a Registered Nurse at a major hospital here in Texas and my son got very close to finishing but he quit before he was completely finished he only needs a half of a semester to finish up. One poorly matched goal that I had was to lose down to 150 pounds from 225, I got so close I went from 225 to 169 and gained 30 pounds of it back. I have got to get back on top of this weight thing I do not want to gain it all back. I am already depressed about the weight gain as it is. I know that it is a mental thing and all I have to do is exercise but that is hard to do when you work full time and take classes full time. Goal selection and well-being are related to each other. Two studies role of gut feelings within the elf-concordance model of goal pursuit (Sheldon & Elliot, 1999). Using a correlational design,...
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