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Global Warming Opposing Viewpoints Paper

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Global Warming Opposing Viewpoints Paper

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Global warming is a major issue in society. It has entered political speeches, agendas, pop culture, and sparks scientific debate. Global warming has been said to be responsible for heat waves, the rise of sea levels, flooding, drought, malnutrition, water pollution, and spread of disease. There is proof that the Earth’s temperature has risen, but is that really a threat? According to Jonathon Patz, with the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Sari Kovats, with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, “Populations in warmer regions tend to be sensitive to low temperatures, and populations in colder climates are sensitive to heat……Mortality is primarily due to cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory disease” (Pratz and Kovats 2). Heat waves are more prominent in areas of growing cities where vegetation has been replaced my concrete, asphalt, tar roofs, and other “heat retaining surfaces (Pratz and Kovats 2). A rise in temperature increases photochemical smog which can intensify asthma and allergies. Pratz and Kovats also go on to say that mortality increases when temperatures are at extremes. Their most compelling example is the heat wave of Chicago in 1995 which caused the deaths of 514 people. Pratz and Kovats claim that a rise in Earth’s temperature has significant effect on mortality. According to Thomas Gale Moore, a senior at the Hoover Institution, warmer climates are unlikely to create a rise heat-related deaths. He mentions a point made by Science Magazine that “people adapt…. One doesn’t see large numbers of cases of heat stroke in New Orleans or Phoenix, even though they are much warmer than Chicago” (Moore 4). In other words, people adjust to the difference in climate. Moore states that no evidence exists proving that a rise in temperature truly increases mortality rates. He agrees the stresses of heat can increase mortality, but usually affects the sick or elderly who’s lives had just a short time...