Glass Ceiling

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United States and the Glass Ceiling

Women and minorities, despite their growing prominence in the work force, are statistically shown to be excluded from high-level corporate positions. The glass ceiling is a term describing the barrier that prevents minorities, particularly women, from reaching the top tier. Recently, there are more women breaking through the divide, but their percentages are small and are growing at a glacial pace. Therefore, the glass ceiling can no longer be thought of as impenetrable, but as more of a semipermeable membrane. Women must overcome the many hurdles that contribute to the existence of the glass ceiling, like education, lifestyle, and cliquish behavior based on stereotypes. In order for the United States to see gender equality in the workforce, there must be major attitude adjustments that can only be influenced by cultural changes brought on by new governments policies. One of the main reasons women were considered substandard in the past is their lack of schooling. In the past, women were discouraged from pursuing higher education because it was believed that they were intellectually inferior and could not mentally handle complexities of advanced learning. This old belief has been debunked with the continuous surge of women excelling in post-graduation studies. Women have since received better opportunities in the general working environment, and as of 2010 “comprise 47 percent of the total U.S. labor force” (Women). As women are establishing their roles in predominantly male fields, men also see advantages in female dominated careers and experience what is now call the glass elevator. Though this may be considered unfair due to the prejudices women already face, it shows that norms of gender association with particular jobs are less prevalent and cultivates the movement towards gender equality in the workforce. The public is seeing more attention paid to women for top managerial positions as the years pass....
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