Gita - Suffering

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Kazi Islam
Final Paper: Suffering
Job and Arjuna’s Sufferings

“But if I were really at fault,
Does my fault wholly lie with me?
If you wish to act as my superiors
And scold me for my own disgrace,
Just know that a god behaving crookedly
Got his net around me.”
(Job 19: 4-6)

Human suffering happens every day and when it does one can ask: Does human suffering have meaning? The answer can be drawn from the two reading, The Bhagavad-Gita and The Book of Job. However when examining this question, it is found that the two readings have different ideas on meaning or the reason for suffering. Looking at the definition of the verb (to) suffer, feel or undergo pain; sustain damage or loss (Merriam-Webster dictionary online). It can be seen that suffering is something that can happen because of more than one action. Each of the readings explained a different ways of sufferings. The Book of Job described that suffering placed on Job is a test. This test of Job’s devotion resulted from a challenge towards God by “the Accuser” (Job 1:9). On the other hand, The Bhagavad Gita described that a person's path to self-knowledge and discipline comes with conflict and suffering. Thus we can draw that there can be more than one meaning of suffering. Many ideas arise on the issue of suffering in The Book of Job. To Job, suffering happens as a result of God’s testing. It is a test of one’s faith in God. In The Book of Job, Satan questioned the followings of God's people. This led to God testing Job. God made Job suffer in the worst way any human being could. This would be mental suffering. When God took away Job's family and possessions, he suffered mentally. All of his possessions and loved ones were gone without a reason known to him. The opening idea on suffering presented on The Book of Job was that the suffering imposed on Job was not in relation to his sins but rather used to test and...
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