Girl Child Education

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Education of Girls:

Even after fifty-five years of independence of India, girls in India do not have the opportunities to educate themselves, in spite of education being fundamental rights in the constitution of India. Mann Deshi Mahila Bank (women Bank) and Mann Vikas Samajik Sanstha (NGO) consider their primary task to work on education of girls. If women have assets and are educated they would never be vulnerable as they are today.

Women’s bank and NGO have annual meeting to gather, and members of both the organization who are women, every year they take up the campaign for the social issues. In 1999, the campaign was taken up on “women will not kill female fetus”, which was against sex determination test. Since last two years women members of the Bank and NGO are emphasizing on health and education.

It is so obvious that if income of women increases and if they have control on their income they tend to invest in the education and health of the families. Bank with the partnership of NGO have already started health insurance is now focusing on the education, especially on girls education. NGO and Bank started the program, when Maya, a twelve-year-old girl came to the office of Bank and said, “I have passed my seventh grade with second rank and want to go for the VIII Grade but as there is no bus; to go to high school from my village my parents are withdrawing my name from the school.

This incident made us think seriously, though we immediately contacted Maya Parents and teacher and provided her bicycle. This became the regular program.

State of education

Education for all continues to be acute problem in India. Despite the fact that government targets were education for all by 2000.An estimated facts are as below, 33% of children above age of 7 are illiterate, 42 million are not able to get access to basic education. And 100 million children are out of the school. The plight of girls remains considerably worse then the boys. Drop out rates are increased in recent Years, according to the recent statistics, over 40% of the children in class 1to 4 dropped in 1999-2000 compared to 38% in 1997-1998.


Reduce the drop out from the school is major challenge.80%of the poor live in rural area where barrier to staying in the school can be classified in following way.

*Lack of schools approximately 16.6% of the habitants is not served by primary school with in a distance of 1km.

*In case of upper primary school 28.5% of the habitants are not served with in the official distance norm of 3km. poor quality of existing school.

*Poor infrastructure of the school, 40% of schools children have no access to safe drinking Water and 10% schools are rum in thatched hut.

*Lack of trained teachers is also the one of the reason of poor attendance.

There are reasons on the demand side also; these are direct cost, opportunity cost and social taboos especially in case of girls. Girls are often taken out of the school to help with family responsibilities such as caring for the younger siblings; fetching water and cooking at the time of harvest, as even wage earner go to work in three shifts during season. Girls are also likely to be taken out of school, if there is no transportation available to the secondary or high school parents avoid sending girls.

United Nations cannot achieve millennium goal, unless India does effective role in education of its children, especially girls.

Program to open the doors of education to girls,
Providing bicycles:

Even in such situation rural communities are trying to work out the solutions to educate their children and to educate their sons parents even go for the loans and end up paying higher interests to the private lenders. Once the income of women rises and they have control on their income they prefer to invest in education and health of the family. Though primary and secondary education is free but parents have to spend on books...
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