Gillette Marketing Report

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  • Topic: Shaving, Duracell, Safety razor
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  • Published : February 20, 2013
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Institute Of Management Sciences

Subject:
Cases in Management

Assignment Topic:
Report on Gillette

Table of Content

1. Industry Evolution___________________________________4

2. Company History____________________________________8

3. Over View of Industry_________________________________9

4. Razor Wars________________________________________13

5. Vision & Mission____________________________________20

6. Gillette Culture_____________________________________21

7. Gillette Strategy in Pakistan____________________________23

• Sales

• Structure

• Product Detail

• Financial Analysis

• Vision & Future Growth

8. Gillette Future Strategies_______________________________24

9. External Analysis____________________________________25

10. Competitor Analysis_________________________________26

11. Marketing Strategy__________________________________27

12. SWOT Analysis_____________________________________28

13. Competitors Analysis_________________________________30

14. Marketing Mix_____________________________________32

15. BCG Model________________________________________33

16. Porter Analysis____________________________________35

17. Product Life Cycle__________________________________36

18. Conclusion and Suggestions__________________________ 37

19.Refernce________________________________________40

Toiletry/Hygiene Industry Evolution. . .

Through much of history Europe was a largely agricultural region with a relativity dispersed population, in the late 1700s and early 1800s various inventions entirely altered the continent's production of goods. The industrial revolution triggered a mass migration of people into the cities for employment and permanently transformed the urban landscape. While the industrial revolution profoundly impacted Europe as a whole, the most accessible English language documentation on conditions in Europe during the industrial revolution focuses on the UK. As a result, much of the information in this section will focus on the UK and the United States. | |

In the UK, many of the factory workers lived in slums. Contemporary writers described these slums as all being virtually alike. One or two story cottages crowded together on streets often so narrow that people could only pass one another with difficulty. Though the cottages had several rooms, often an entire family would live in a single room. In the most crowded neighborhoods scenes have been described where, indiscriminate of age or gender, 15 to 20 partially or completely unclothed people slept on the floor of a single room. One preacher talking about his parish says, “It contains 1,400 houses, inhabited by 2,795 families, or about 12,000 persons. The space upon which this large population dwells, is less than 400 yards (1,200 feet) square” The streets were generally unpaved, rough, dirty and filled with trash. People would toss out food, animal refuse, and even human excrement. There were often no sewers and “foul stagnant pools” collected to run off into the drinking water. There was very poor ventilation and the smell was overpowering. In some cities, the streets would fill up with mud to the ankles for months on end. Pure rivers running into the city ran out as black stinking sludge, collected from the runoff of factories and dwellings alike. Coal dust often darkened the air. With these conditions, it is hardly surprising that disease was rampant. Cholera, typhus, typhoid, and influenza were all prevalent. There were also outbreaks of smallpox and whooping cough. The first outbreak of cholera, which is often spread by water contaminated with fecal matter, was in Sunderland, England, in the fall of 1831. In the course of the outbreak, 52,000 died. From 1837-1838, the leading cause of death by fever became typhus which is...
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