Gilgamesh and Enkidu

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Bordenkircher 1
Ty Bordenkircher
Professor Tanja Nathanael
English 203: World Literature
9 April 2013
I have read, understand, and am in compliance with the Academic Honesty policy. In particular, I have not committed any kind of plagiarism. There are no unattributed direct or indirect quotations or paraphrases from printed materials, websites, other students' papers, or any other sources in my essay. The Battle of Civilization and the Environment

Throughout the Epic of Gilgamesh, many heroic battles take place. The story is encompassed with numerous battles where Gilgamesh and Enkido use their swords, wits and strength to defeat the enemy. These battles are seen clearly outlined in the story. However, the most important battle in this story is not so clearly told. This battle occurs inward. This is the battle between civilization and the environment. This conflict roots from the relationship between Gilgamesh and Enkido. While Enkidu and Gilgamesh change one another throughout the story, Enkidu ultimately follows Gilgamesh, and succumbs to civilization, because civilization cannot grow without the use of natural resources.

King Gilgamesh built the mightiest kingdom in all the land. The Empire thrived and continued to grow. Gilgamesh prided himself on his creation and strives for greatness. He worked to build his city to grow bigger and stronger. As a passage in the book reads, “He carved on a stone stela all of his toils, and built the wall of Uruk-Haven, the walls the likes of which no one can equal! Take hold of the threshold stone - it dates from ancient times! Go close to the Eanna Temple, the residence of Ishtar, such as no king or man has ever equaled! Go up on the wall of Uruk and walk around, examine its foundation, inspect its brickwork thoroughly. Is it not the brick structure made of kiln-fired brick, and did not the Seven Sages themselves lay out its plans? (Anonymous). This passage is specifically pungent to the topic, at...
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