George Tenet

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Introduction:
Emerging from the cold streets of Queens New York surfaced a warm loyal and honest young man by the name George Tenet. Growing up he worked at his family’s diner. He graduated from high school and later received his Bachelor’s degree from Columbia University. George went on to accomplish many goals such as serving as a research director for the American Hellenic Institute and legislative director to Pennsylvania’s Senator John Heinz III. He went on to serve on the Senate Select Committee of Intelligence from 1985-1993 before President Clifton allotted him Senior Director of Intelligence programs and National Secretary Councils. (CIA.gov) George Tenet served as the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (DCI) from 1997 until 2004 (George Tenet.2013. Biography). Was he ready for this you ask? Well from reviewing his education, past endeavors as well as his term as deputy director of CIA some would say yes, but the majority would sound a gigantic No!! His tainted loyalties and ethical code dilemmas would give them pause. I will give an analysis of four cross-coded ethical dilemmas facing former CIA Director George Tenet and assess their impact on his leadership abilities, four ways in which Tenet addressed the prioritization of ethical concerns, Identify and explain four strategies used in competing ethical obligations in relation to the many intergovernmental organizations that overlapped his office and give an elaboration on four relevant notions for designing ethical maps for defining and prioritizing ethical obligations. Tenets role as DCI included managing an agency with two sides, one as a spy and the other analytic of raw intelligence responsible for the President’s Daily Brief and the National Intelligence Estimate (White, 2008). His role also included maintaining communication between the Directorate of Operations and the Directorate of Intelligence, presidential intelligence advisor, and I “head of the intelligence community” (White, 2008). Majority of Mr. Tenet’s ethical dilemmas were based on his professional role. His first ethical dilemma came upon being sworn in as DCI. The dilemma was to be seen by President Clinton or to focus on reconstruction of the CIA. Since Mr. Tenet chose to focus on the reconstruction of the CIA, President Clinton did not include him in his intelligence committee or as part of the Clinton administration cabinet. The fact that he was not included in the Clinton administration cabinet left room for him to be appointed during the Bush administration but by default and word-of-mouth. The second dilemma was during peace talks between the Palestinians and Israelis during the fall of 1998 under President Clinton. This dilemma was to position himself as a diplomat or as DCI with internal information regarding a convicted spy. This dilemma almost cost him his position as DCI. President Clinton was about to ignore his threat of resignation until the Speaker of the House denied the request of release as well. The third dilemma took place when President Bush came into office. Mr. Tenet was asked to brief President Bush every morning. The dilemma was to partake in the president's daily intelligence meeting or continue focusing on rebuilding the CIA. The fact that Mr. Tenet chose to brief President Bush every morning rather than handling business at the CIA so his preference to be seen by the president. Not only did Mr. Tenet brief the president every morning but he also brought in intelligence agents that were at the fore front of any issue being discussed at that meeting. This decision illustrated a possible favoritism for the Republican Party or the Bush administration and also could have compromised the agents that were present during those meetings. The fourth dilemma was when vice president Cheney speech was given at the Veterans of Foreign Wars convention. The dilemma was what to leave in Vice President Richard Cheney's speech. Mr. Tenet says, “…I should not have...
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