Geography Course Work- Why Is North Norfolk Coastline Manged ?

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Why is the coast managed in North Norfolk?

3 million people in the UK live near the coast, which makes it very important to protect the coast from erosion and flooding .It’s also a very popular tourist destination and if that got eroded or flood it would lose money for the economy. This is why the coast is managed to protect the coastline.

There 4 main coastal processes are erosion, weathering, deposition and longshore drift. Weathering happens when material is being worn away but doesn’t move anywhere. Erosion happens when material broken down and moved away. Whereas deposition happens when material is being added to an area. Then longshore drift happens when material transported along the coast. The UK coast line is a dynamic system, which means that is always changing.

Coastal erosion is a big problem in the UK because in the UK 28% of the coast is at risk of erosion, which mean there would be a loss in land and houses. The 4 main types of erosion that occurs are attrition, corrosion, hydraulic action and abrasion. Attrition occurs when particles throw against each other breaking them down into smaller fragments. Also corrosion occurs when there’s a chemical reaction between the water and the rocks. Hydraulic action occurs when the waves pound the coast and compress air into cracks causing rocks to break down. Then abrasion occurs when there’s a scraping away of particles against each other wearing them away. These four types of erosion affects the wearing away of land.

A Shoreline Management Plan is in a strategy is set out coastal defence for a specified length of coast taking account of natural coastal processes and human and other environmental influences. The aim is to provide the basis for sustainable coastal defence, to also reduce erosion from further loss of land and set objectives for the future management of the shoreline.

The government creates shoreline management. Shoreline management plans organise management of large stretches of coastline. There are four generic strategic coastal defence options - Do nothing – carry out no coastal defence activity except for safety measures. Hold the existing line – shoreline protected by sea walls. Advance the existing line – constructing new defences seaward. Retreat the existing line – constructing or maintaining coastal structures.

The shoreline is essential for the economy of the area in north Norfolk. It is used as a base for commercial and tourism. All these activities support the villages along the shoreline that provide a range of accommodation, shops, restaurants and other facilities.

Norfolk is in the east of England. It is in between the North Sea and the English Channel. The nearby towns and cities are......

Sheringham the north of north Norfolk and a nearby town is Cromer. Happisburgh and sea palling are on the east of north Norfolk. The towns are next to each other.

The three sites differ from each out for comparison because they have different SMP. Happisburgh is do nothing, Sea palling is

Figure1: This image shows bar charts showing the bipolar evaluation in all at these locations Sheringham, Happisburgh and sea paling. Sheringham has the longest bar chart meaning it has the biggest total bipolar evaluations score. Also Happisburgh has the lowest bar chart meaning it has the lowest total bipolar evaluation.

Figure 2: This image shows pie charts showing wave counts deciding whether its consecutive waves and destructive waves from the frequency with which waves strike the shore at these locations Sheringham, Happisburgh and sea paling. Happisburgh has the biggest circle which means it has destructive waves causing there to be more erosion.

The graph shows a rose diagram of the bipolar evaluation at Happisburgh. The general trend this graph shows is that cost, flooding, disturbance are scored quite high, however aesthetics,...
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