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Generosity

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  • Jan. 6, 2013
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Generosity

Behavior is the most important thing in generosity. It is the habit of giving without expecting anything in return. It can involve offering time, assets or talents to aid someone in need. Often equated with charity as a virtue, generosity is widely accepted in society as a desirable trait.

It is important that how you deal with other people. Ibn `Abbas said that he heard Prophet Muhammad say, “The believer is not the one who eats when his neighbor beside him is hungry,” another companion heard the Prophet say, “The believer is simple and generous, but the wicked person is deceitful and ignoble.” If you want people to be nice to you then you should also be nice to everyone. Generosity was among the countless good qualities of the Prophet Muhammad. He was the most generous of people and he used to be most generous in Ramadan.

Another important thing is the level of respect you give to all groups of people. You should never do backbiting; it decreases the respect for that person. “O you who believe! Avoid much suspicion, indeed some suspicions are sins. And spy not, neither backbite one another. Would one of you like to eat the flesh of his dead brother? You would hate it (so hate backbiting). And fear God. Verily, God is the One Who accepts repentance, Most Merciful.” (Quran 49:12). You should always respect everyone. A true believer strives to improve himself and is aware of his responsibility to protect others rather than disrespect them. In Islam, believers do not disrespect each other nor do they tolerate disrespect towards their brothers and sisters.

Generosity can also be spending time, money, or labor, for others, without being rewarded in return “I left a piece of gold at home which was given for charity and I disliked letting it remain a night in my house, so I bought it to the mosque to distribute.” (Saheeh Al-Bukhari). Islam always teaches about generosity.