Gender Stereotype and the Media

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 160
  • Published : March 4, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Gender stereotypes and the media:

Today, we live in a world that is (stratified) divided into castes, classes, or other groups based on status, or be formed into such groups along lines of gender, race, ethnicity, class, age, disability, sexuality and location, and in which the privileges, disadvantages and exclusions associated with each categories are unfairly distributed. We also live in a world which is increasingly saturated by media and information and communication technologies. Why media influences are important?

In modern societies, people typically consume many hours of television each week, look at magazines and other publications, surf the Internet, pass-billboards, go to the movies, and are generally unable to avoid popular culture and advertising. Representation matter

The study of gender and media is extraordinary heterogeneous (diverse). So, researchers may agree that cultural representations institute, an important site for examination the study. The field is thus characterized by a popularity of different approaches and perspectives: different theoretical perspectives, different understanding of power, relationship between representations and ‘reality’ and different understanding of how media images relate to individuals sense of identity and subjectivity. Representation of women in the media

Late 1960s and 1970s, those who involved in the tide of feminist activity, thinking and activism, faced a new challenge that the world dominant by media including news and magazines, on radio and television, in film and billboard. So media became more focus of feminist research. Women who were working or studying in university at newly emerged discipline, for example cultural studies or communication studies became more increasingly aware of ‘blind spot’- characterised this field related to gender. In 1972 ‘New York Times Magazine ‘published a studies that conducted by the National Organization of Women (NOW), over the past 18 months on 1200 US...
tracking img