Gender Socialization

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  • Topic: Doll, Gender, G.I. Joe
  • Pages : 4 (1532 words )
  • Download(s) : 224
  • Published : April 24, 2013
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The very moment we are born into this world we are bombarded with an astounding amount of information, so much information that our tiny brains are unable to even comprehend what is going on within our very own presence. We are taken home from the hospital and placed in our cribs, often times if you are a male your crib may be the color of blue and if you are a female it may be pink, as this is the social norm. Our parents give us toys to play with or chew on to occupy us between our busy schedules of crying and sleeping and we begin the never ending process of our development as functioning human beings within the world. Little do we know at this age that everything we are handed such as toys, videogames, books and movies have an effect on the growth of our individual characteristics and our gender identities. The simple fact that our cribs are a certain color is in fact planting the idea in our minds that these colors are what are acceptable for our gender. Gender socialization is the transmission of norms and values about what boys and girls can and should do. As children we are treated a certain way based on our gender. We learn from our parents what behaviors are considered appropriate and inappropriate for our sex, boys are told to act tough and girls are given sympathy in times of emotional distress. Boys are held to expectations of liking sports and rough housing where as girls are expected to express “ladylike” behaviors, such as using their manners and sitting quietly in place. Some people say that ones’ gender identity is not socially constructed but biologically constructed. Meaning that when you are born you inherently know how to behave in regards to your gender. All of your interests, beliefs, and actions follow a specific presumed manner dependent on if you are female or male. This theory just simply does not add up, for during the Victorian era a male was looked at to withhold a high social status and high level of manliness based on the...
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