Gender in Sports

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Gender Differences in Sports
For plenty of years the women nature has been looked upon as homemakers, hairdressers, wives and mothers. As women step out into the world to pursue dreams, careers, and aspirations, many have come across the issues of playing on male teams. With the decline of women sports in high school, college and the Olympics, women are starting to train their self to play with the men causing this case to become more and more popular. Many women are finding spots on teams that are within their reach but are often dangled above their head to look but not touch because of their gender. Sports are an important part of the culture of almost every nation. However, its use to promote gender equality and to help empower girls and women are often overlooked because sports are not universally perceived as a suitable or desirable pursuit for girls and women. Today society’s definition of masculinity and femininity, or socially accepted ways of expressing what it means to be a man or woman, play a key role in determining access, levels of participation, and benefits from sports.

Since 1972, Title IX, which states no person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance, been in effect, some schools choose to follow and some still find it hard to accept. But thanks to our society, we have put labels onto what a male should play. For example, males should enjoy rough, rowdy types of environments, synchronized swimming and ballet are something they should not be a part of. Therefore, those are something girls would enjoy.

Although Jenelle Greer, from Lehigh Valley Live, is a female, she agrees with the fact that females should not mix with male teams because “plain and simple, females are the weaker vessels of the two sexes. It's not degrading. It's not an insult. It's a fact...
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