Gender Gap in Cyberspace

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“Gender Gap in Cyberspace” is written by Deborah Tannen, in 1994. She has written many books and articles on the differences in male and female communication styles. In the article “Gender Gap in Cyberspace” Tannen compares differences the way men and women approach new technologies. She contrasts her experiences with one of her colleagues named Ralph. Tannen and Ralph were both computer pioneers, buying their first machines in 1980. While Ralph became a computer expert, Tannen remained a self-described novice. The computer games that came with her first Apple IIe didn't interest her. She did, however, get hooked on e-mail, which seemed like a form of "souped-up conversation." First she states that Ralph pursued ever-newer technology, "buying and mastering it as quickly as he could afford," Tannen writes. By contrast, Tannen "hung on to old equipment far too long because I dislike giving up what I'm used to, fear of making the wrong decision about what to buy and resenting the time it takes to install and learn a new system." She believes that men is more aggressive/motivated than women when it comes to technologies. Secondly, Tannen argues that boys are more likely to be captivated (attracted) by computers than girls are. Because When the machine refuses to do what it's told, men dig in their heels to show it who is boss and get it to do what they say. By contrast, Tannen writes, "Girls and women are more likely to respond, 'This thing won't cooperate. Get it away from me!'" Men wanted to be in charge, want everything undercontrol, women will just simple ignore it. At last, Tannen says “Once I learned the basics, my interest in computer waned (decline,disappear,fade)” Most women want only one thing from a computer – to work. Women only learned what is necessary to get the job done, but for men, they demand more than that, they wanted to be expert on the field and be more involved.
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