Gender Analysis

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LUPANE STATE UNIVERSITY
HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

DEPARTMENTDEVELOPMENT STUDIES

PROGRAMMEBSsc HONOURS DEGREE

STUDENT NAMEFAITH SHARLEEN NKALA

ID NO#L011 0310K

MODULEGENDER AND DEVELOPMENT (HSDS 2102)

LECTURERMR T. DUBE

DEFINE GENDER ANALYSIS AND DEMONSTRATE ITS IMPORTANCE IN DEVELOPMENT WORK AND RESEARCH. DUE28/09/2012
This paper seeks to draw attention at the meaning of gender analysis and its importance in development and research. However, one needs to first understand what is meant by gender and what it entails. According to FAO, (1997) gender can be defined as ‘the relations between men and women, both perceptual and material, it is not determined biologically, as a result of sexual characteristics of either women or men but constructed socially. It is also a central organizing principle of societies and often governs the processes of production, reproduction, consumption and distribution.’ Gender is about the roles that are created by the society for male and females, their responsibilities and needs. The definition of gender analysis will act as a guideline to discuss and identify the role of gender analysis in development and research. To also understand that the term gender does not only refer and promote women but that men are heavily involved in the description and definition of the term Dunn, (2008:14) defines gender analysis as a process that helps to assess the differential impact of development policies and programmes on groups of males and females. From this definition one can denote that gender analysis is not a one day event but it is a process that seeks to evaluate the effects of different programmes and policies on men and women. Reeves and Baden, (2000) describe gender analysis as the systematic gathering and examination of information on gender differences and social relations in order to identify , understand and redress inequities based on gender. Information is gathered and checked on the differences between women and men so as to understand the imbalances that are occurring in different societies. Gender analysis points out varied and different roles and responsibilities between women/girls and men/boys that they have in their families, communities, their nation through production angle (economy). First and foremost, according to CIDA, (2012) gender analysis brings about information that can lead to the creation of measures to address the disparities and promote equality. In the case of primary education, gender analysis can tell that a gender gap exists in most countries, that is, there is a gap between girls’ and boys’ enrolment and retention in school. In the majority of countries where there is a gender gap, the gap works against girls but in others it works against boys. For example, in India an average six year old girl can expect to spend six years in school, three years less than a boy of the same age. Girls in the rural areas of India are at greater disadvantage; their risk of dropping out of school is three times that of a boy. To add, Jamaica in contrast presents a different case as boys are the ones who are at a higher risk of missing out on education. This is because boys are often pulled out of school and sent to work to boost family income and thus, their drop out is higher than that of girls (CIDA 2012). Governments have used gender analysis to investigate the source of the gap and what measures can be adopted to reduce the distortions in the educational system. Hence, information that is brought about aids different stakeholders to make a shift in ensuring that balance is presented within these two countries. Gender analysis aids in identifying realities that people face as it separates analysis of men and women, their problems, needs and access to power and resources. For instance, ‘in atypical rural area in an African country, loans were made available to men as households in the community to develop small farming. As...
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