Gen 200 - Academic Integrity Paper

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The Internet age has caused academic institutions and students to rethink academic integrity. College and university administrators have created new policies, codes of conduct, and training programs to counteract the negative impact of the Internet. Several online resources have been created to allow students to check for plagiarism yet the problem persists. Academic dishonesty in all forms was not created by the Internet, but has always existed. Students can employ several strategies to avoid academic dishonesty. Academic integrity or dishonesty remains the choice of each individual student

Academic Integrity in the Internet Age

Student Name

University of Phoenix

GEN/200

Instructor Name

Abstract

The Internet age has caused academic institutions and students to rethink academic integrity. College and university administrators have created new policies, codes of conduct, and training programs to counteract the negative impact of the Internet. Several online resources have been created to allow students to check for plagiarism yet the problem persists. Academic dishonesty in all forms was not created by the Internet, but has always existed. Students can employ several strategies to avoid academic dishonesty. Academic integrity or dishonesty remains the choice of each individual student.

Academic Integrity In The Internet Age

Academic integrity is based upon the establishment of academic standards, ethical boundaries, and an educational process that focuses on learning as the overall objective. According to the University of Phoenix Student Code of Conduct, “Academic integrity violations include all forms of academic dishonesty” and have many consequences (University of Phoenix, 2009). The Internet and the World Wide Web have made it considerably easier for students to perpetrate academic dishonesty.. It is simpler than ever before for students to find other people’s words on a topic and pass them off as their own with a simple copy-and-paste maneuver (Embleton & Helfer, 2007, para. 2). Fortunately, many strategies exist to help students avoid academic dishonesty. Defining Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty is making a false representation to gain an unjust advantage (University of Newcastle, 2009). Academic dishonesty is a serious problem that begins in early education and persists in higher education. Studies show the more students cheat in high school, the higher the chances they will also cheat in college. A 1998 study, Who’s Who Among American High School Students revealed 80% of the country’s best high school seniors cheated in their attempts to graduate at the top of their class (McCleaster, 2003). “According to the Educational Testing Service (as quoted in McCleaster, 2003), “more than 75% of college students have admitted to cheating” (para. 2). As a result, students rob themselves of gaining higher education and the pursuit of knowledge when they engage in academic misconduct in the forms of cheating, plagiarizing, and fabricating to get ahead. Cheating

One of the well-known types of academic dishonesty is cheating. Students practice various methods of cheating such as copying their homework from other students, looking over his or her shoulders to obtain answers during a quiz or exam, and hiding answers in their notes or in a calculator for an exam. In addition, technology has made cheating easier and more convenient for students to pass vital information to other students through the usage of cell phones. Students can text and take pictures of the test or test bank and distribute the information to other people over the Internet. Embleton and Helfer (2007), stated, “There have always been students who have found ways to cheat on exams or to buy term papers from other students” (para. 1). Purchasing term papers or copying term papers without proper citation is another form of academic dishonesty known as...
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