Gay Marriage -- Argument Essay

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Marriage: A Human Right, Not A Heterosexual Privilege

As of November 7, 2012, gay marriage has been legalized in nine U.S. states (Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Iowa, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Washington) including the District of Columbia. However, thirty-one states have constitutional amendments banning gay marriage and six states have laws banning gay marriage. There are many arguments surrounding this controversy that express extremely different opinions regarding supposed outcomes and benefits that would come along with legalizing gay marriage.

Opponents argue that legalizing gay marriage will only whither traditional marriage. According to the Constitution and the Bible, the institution of marriage has been defined as between one man and one woman. In the 1971 decision of Baker v Nelson, the Supreme Court ruled that “The institution of marriage as a union of man and woman, uniquely involving the procreation and rearing of children within a family, is as old as the book of Genesis.”

In a religious point of view, gay marriage is not compatible with the beliefs and traditions of many religious groups. Despite teaching that homosexuals deserve respect, the Catholic Church opposes gay marriage and the social acceptance of homosexuality and same-sex relationships. As the pope said, "No other form of relationship between persons can be considered as an equivalent to this natural relationship between a man and a woman out of whose love children are born." In an economic point of view, gay marriage would entitle gay couples to typical marriage benefits including claiming a tax exemption for a spouse, receiving social security payments from a deceased spouse, and coverage by a spouse’s health insurance policy.

Supporters argue that legalizing gay marriage is, in fact, protected by the Constitution’s commitment to liberty and equality. In the 1974 decision of Cleveland Board of Education v LaFleur, the Supreme Court ruled that “freedom...
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