Gatsby Unreliable Narrator

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F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel “The Great Gatsby” is told through the character Nick Carraway's modified first person perspective; the story is that of one Jay Gatsby but as to why Nick narrates immediately arises suspicions. I reckon Nick has been used, coincidentally living next door to Gatsby, to embody the outsider who like many of the readers has very little and is attracted to the life of the very rich. And yet, at the same time, he hates the falseness and hypocrisy and cruelty of their lives. Although these negative qualities humanize him making him reliable Nick's split perspective brings about the contrasts between the worldly (normal) and the idealistic attitudes of the two main groups of characters; those from East of West egg and those from Queens/ The Valley of Ashes. Juxtaposition is used in order to mock one of both aspects of society, I think Fitzgerald has purposely used this running theme of contrasting lifestyles to emphasise Nick's suggestibility and questions where his loyalty lies. It is also important to note and question Nick's part in the whole story because as he and constantly think as to why it took him a whole An unreliable narrator.

there are many things that leads to the reader

in the scheme of things the reader learns to accept Nick's narration as fact as he claims in chapter one that he is “inclined to reserve all judgements” but later admits that he will not judge Gatsby because of his “extraordinary gift for hope, a romantic readiness”. This demonstrates how as a narrator he should be detached; hold a neutral perspective and only portray the truth, yet he becomes involved and seemingly spellbound by the “Great” Gatsby.

In conclusion I feel Fitzgerald does create mystery, successfully, through uu
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