Gatsby Poem

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 80
  • Published : April 9, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
The True Colours of the Party

The jazz roars behind the crowds,
I watch the shadows of the orange sun, and
The colors of the rich golden sand.
I watch the oranges and lemons glistening with the evening twilight, and The brass rails glowing the marble steps, leading to my dreams.

The moon illuminates the bright blue gardens.
I watch the short-haired girls, watching them swoon freely,
Us men getting drunk, drinking champagne by the sea.
I watch and examine the stars glistening high in the sky,
I know I am at one of the parties of the Great Gatsby.

I watch the girls show off their new diamonds and new dyed hair, The contemptuous men finding their affairs
I watch them banter about their lavish vacations overseas
This is West Egg in the nineteen twenties.
The party has started.

But as I watch the true colours of the party, seeing only shades of black and white. I see the lost hearts here, dance their hearts out tonight.

The True Colours of the Party - Response
The True Colours of the Party demonstrate Gatsby’s parties in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and the different principles of the 1920s. It uses words such as “Jazz” (popular type of music), “steps leading to my dreams” (the American dream), and “short-haired girls” (which was a new style back then) to illustrate the Jazz Age. Nick is the writer of this poem, and throughout the poem, he is observing and describing the different colors he sees in the party. The first stanza is orange and it symbolizes warmth, energy and vigour to illustrate the “jazz [roaring]”, the “rich golden sun” and the “oranges and lemons”. The second stanza is blue, and it symbolizes purity, life and tranquility to illustrate the “bright blue gardens”, the “champagne by the sea”, and the “sky”. The third stanza is green, and it symbolizes money and wealth to illustrate “new diamonds”, “lavish vacations overseas”, and “West Egg in the nineteen twenties” (a wealthy neighbourhood). The fourth stanza is...
tracking img