Gas and High Temperature Argon

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  • Topic: Argon, Gas, Helium
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  • Published : December 5, 2012
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Argon
Argon is an element in the periodic table and it’s a noble gas. Noble gases are different from the other elements because first they are gases and they were hard to find. Argon can be used to fill incandescent and flourescentlight bulbs so that the oxygen doesn't destroy the filament. It is also used for arc welding. Argon is known to form at least one compound, argon fluorohydride. Argon fluorohydride is only stable at very low temperatures. Since it decomposes when it reaches a high temperature argon fluorohydride cannot be used for anything besides basic scientific research. Argon (αργος, Greek meaning "inactive", in reference to its chemical inactivity) was known to be in air by Henry Cavendish in 1785 but was not isolated until 1894 by Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay in Scotland in an experiment in which they removed all of the oxygen, carbon dioxide, water and nitrogen from a sample of clean air.  They had determined that nitrogen produced from chemical compounds was one-half percent lighter than nitrogen from the atmosphere. Argon was the first noble gas to be discovered. The symbol for argon is now Ar, but up until 1957 it was only A. Argon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas. Its density is 1.784 grams per liter. Argon changes from a gas to a liquid at -185.86°C (-302.55°F). Then it changes from a liquid to a solid at -189.3°C (-308.7°F). Argon doesn’t any chemical reactions. On rare occasions, it forms weak, compound-like structures. 0.93 percent of the atmosphere is formed by argon . It is also found in the Earth's crust to the extent of about 4 parts per million. Even though argon is non-toxic, it satisfies the body's need for oxygen and is thus an asphyxiate. Argon is 25% more dense than air and is very dangerous in closed areas. It is also difficult to find because it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless. Citation: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argon

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