Garnier Fructis Case Study

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Garnier Fructis Marketing Communication Strategy Introduced in 2003, Garnier Fructis was L’Oreal’s answer to major competitors such as Unilever and P&G’s mass-market products. Garnier Fructis entered the hair care market with its sleek and bright green bottles of extra creamy shampoo that smelled like fruits and was infused with natural ingredients. With its salon-inspired line of shampoos that ranged from dandruff control to color protection, Garnier Fructis’ objective was to capture market share in a wide range of benefit-oriented segments of the hair care market. Garnier Fructis offered consumers affordable but sophisticated hair care products that promised to deliver on a range of needs. Garnier Fructis promoted its hair care products as natural and high technology that offered everyday hair care needs for moisture, curls, dandruff control, color protection, and nutrition. With such a wide range of products, Garnier Fructis offered a one-stop shop for all hair care product consumers; a strategy followed by almost all major hair care product manufacturers. However, it was Garnier’s smart marketing communications strategy that enabled Garnier Fructis to become a leading name in the consumer hair care market. With the support of L’Oreal, its parent company, Garnier Fructis began its operations on a sound financial foundation. In 2004, Maybelline New York, another subsidiary of L’Oreal, announced a $180 million marketing campaign in order to move Garnier Fructis from a niche brand to a national brand.1 Garnier Fructis was introduced in the U.S. as a mass-market consumer hair care product. Its successful debut overseas as a niche product served as a launching pad for its introduction in the U.S. as a mass-market product. In order to create a successful national brand, the brand message needed to be communicated effectively and efficiently. Garnier Fructis’ marketing communications focused heavily on advertising, sales promotion, and public relations. This generated national awareness about its natural, affordable, and innovative products. Garnier Fructis also partnered with Publicis Worldwide, New York, to launch its marketing campaign in 2004.1 Garnier Fructis’ marketing campaigns have continually focused on creating awareness about the benefits of its products. Garnier Fructis’ benefit approach towards segmenting its target market has driven campaigns that focus on these specific benefits. Garnier Fructis’ bright green bottles with labels announcing vitamins, essential oils, and hair nutrients make it stand out from the myriad of other hair care products available in the market. The product labels on bottles feature a “fact box” that highlights the sophisticated technology used.2 Besides being a standout in the consumer product section due to its “green” image, Garnier Fructis’ success stems from the strong distribution channel it inherited from its parent and other sister companies. L’Oreal and Maybelline are both national brands with significant market shares and are available in major retail stores such as Walmart, Target, and Albertsons. The collective market equity of these brands provides each brand a strong relationship with its distributors and retailers and adequate product exposure to its customers. Customer retention is propelled by Garnier Fructis’ ability to offer products that are innovative and modern. Current customers find themselves more loyal to a brand that continues to deliver on its original promise. Garnier Fructis’ tagline of “Expect the Unexpected” is supported with its consistent release of

products created with innovative and organic technology such as triple nutrition, active fruit concentrate, and dual action.1 In addition, Garnier’s affordably priced products create the “Unexpected” in its tag line. So in order to spread its message of “Expect the Unexpected”, Garnier Fructis’ promotion mix utilizes both personal and non-personal communication tools. This is the subject of this paper....
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