Gardner's Theory

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Gardner’s Theory

In Gardner’s Theory, he specifies or identifies seven different types of learning or as he states types of intelligence. Gardner defines intelligence as the ability to solve problems. In this theory it is stated that the different type of intelligences are separated in the brain but they also work interdependently. They all work together or compliment each other so as to help one build skills and solve problems.

Interpersonal Intelligence is the ability to understand the feelings of others. This is one of my strong points. I can usually get a good understanding of people by using this intelligence. I also use two other types of Gardner’s Intelligences the most. They are Linguistic Intelligence and Spatial Intelligence. Linguistic Intelligence is the ability to effectively use language to express one’s self. I am quite good at writing poetry and songs, which is one of the ways to use this type of intelligence. Spatial Intelligence is the ability to use or create mental images in order solve problems. An example of this is when I try to do math problems, I usually visualize the problem in my head and then solve it the same way. This used to cause me a lot of problems with my teachers in high school, as they wanted me to show my work and sometimes the answers just popped into my head. I do the same with spelling words. I visualize it in my brain and then spell it out loud or write it down.

The use of these different intelligences are not even thought about but just done. They work concurrently in our brain as to compliment each other. Mostly the intelligences are integrated or work concurrently. These are all separate sources within the human brain which work together to stimulate different learning capabilities.
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