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English Language and Composition Reading Time: 15 minutes Suggested Writing Time: 40 minutes Directions: The following prompt is based on the accompanying six sources. This question requires you to integrate a variety of sources into a coherent, well-written essay. Refer to the sources to support your position; avoid mere paraphrase or summary. Your argument should be central; the sources should support this argument. Remember to attribute both direct and indirect citations. Introduction Television has been influential in United States presidential elections since the 1960’s. But just what is this influence, and how has it affected who is elected? Has it made elections fairer and more accessible, or has it moved candidates from pursuing issues to pursuing image? Assignment Read the following sources (including any introductory information) carefully. Then, in an essay that synthesizes at least three of the sources for support, take a position that defends, challenges, or qualifies the claim that television has had a positive impact on presidential elections. Refer to the sources as Source A, Source B, etc.; titles are included for your convenience. Source A (Campbell) Source B (Hart and Triece) Source C (Menand) Source D (Chart) Source E (Ranney) Source F (Koppel)

SAMPLE QUESTION ONLY: DRAFT FORMAT
Copyright © 2005 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit www.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents).

Source A Campbell, Angus. “Has Television Reshaped Politics? ” In Encyclopedia of Television / Museum of Broadcast Communications, vol. 1, ed. Horace Newcomb. New York: Fitzroy Dearborn, 2005.

The following passage is excerpted from an article about television’s impact on politics. The advent of television in the late 1940’s gave rise to the belief that a new era was opening in public communication. As Frank Stanton, president of the Columbia Broadcasting System, put it: “Not even the sky is the limit.” One of the great contributions expected of television lay in its presumed capacity to inform and stimulate the political interests of the American electorate. “Television, with its penetration, its wide geographic distribution and impact, provides a new, direct, and sensitive link between Washington and the people,” said Dr. Stanton. “The people have once more become the nation, as they have not been since the days when we were small enough each to know his elected representative. As we grew, we lost this feeling of direct contact—television has now restored it.” As time has passed, events have seemed to give substance to this expectation. The televising of important congressional hearings, the national nominating conventions, and most recently the Nixon-Kennedy and other debates have appeared to make a novel contribution to the political life of the nation. Large segments of the public have been given a new, immediate contact with political events. Television has appeared to be fulfilling its early promise.

SAMPLE QUESTION ONLY: DRAFT FORMAT
Copyright © 2005 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit www.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents).

Source B
Hart, Roderick P., and Mary Triece, “U.S. Presidency and Television.” Available at http://www.museum.tv/debateweb/html/equalizer/essay_usprestv.htm.

The following passage is excerpted from an online article that provides a timeline of major events when television and the presidency have intersected. April 20, 1992: Not a historic date perhaps, but a suggestive one. It was on this date [while campaigning for President] that Bill Clinton discussed his underwear with the American people (briefs, not boxers, as it turned out). Why would the leader of the free world unburden himself like this? Why not? In television’s increasingly postmodern world, all texts—serious and...
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