Future of Transport

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  • Topic: Driverless car, DARPA Grand Challenge, Automobile
  • Pages : 5 (1526 words )
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  • Published : January 10, 2013
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GOOGLE'S DRIVERLESS CAR

PRESENTED BY: Mandeep Wadia Atul Sharma Himangshu Talukdar

1/10/2013

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
We express our deepest gratitude to Dr. Piyush Verma (Assistant Professor, L M Thapar School of Management, Thapar University, Patiala) who provided us this opportunity to work on the latest innovations and technologies in industry and without whom, it would not have been possible for us to understand the course that we are following. We are thankful to him whose guidance helped us to understand the concepts involved, for there hidden contribution to this report and also, for enhancing our knowledge and skills towards "Innovation and Technology management". Words are inadequate in offering our thanks to Dr. Piyush Verma, for his encouragement and cooperation in carrying out the project work.

DATE: 10th Jan 2013

PLACE: Patiala

Mandeep Wadia
Atul Sharma
Himangshu Talukdar

INTRODUCTION
The Google driverless car is a project by Google that involves developing technology for driverless cars. The project is currently being led by Google engineer Sebastian Thrun, director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and co-inventor of Google Street View. Thrun's team at Stanford created the robotic vehicle Stanley which won the 2005 DARPA Grand Challenge and its US$2 million prize from the United States Department of Defense. The team developing the system consisted of 15 engineers working for Google, including Chris Urmson, Mike Montemerlo, and Anthony Levandowski who had worked on the DARPA Grand and Urban Challenges. The U.S. state of Nevada passed a law on June 29th, 2011 permitting the operation of driverless cars in Nevada. Google had been lobbying for driverless car laws. The Nevada law went into effect on March 1, 2012, and the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles issued the first license for a self-driven car in May 2012. The license was issued to a Toyota Prius modified with Google's experimental driverless technology. ABOUT IT

An autonomous car, also known as a robotic car or informally as a driverless or self-driving car, is an autonomous vehicle capable of fulfilling the human transportation capabilities of a traditional car. As an autonomous vehicle, it is capable of sensing its environment and navigating without human input. A human may choose a destination, but is not required to perform any mechanical operation of the vehicle. Autonomous vehicles sense their surroundings with such techniques as RADAR, LIDAR, GPS and computer vision. Advanced control systems interpret sensory information to identify appropriate navigation paths, as well as obstacles and relevant signage. Some autonomous vehicles can furthermore update their maps based on sensory input, allowing them to navigate through uncharted environments. Since the late 2000s, significant advances have been made in both technology and legislation relevant to autonomous cars. Numerous major companies have developed working autonomous prototypes, including Google, Nissan, Toyota and Audi. In June 2011, the state of Nevada was the first jurisdiction in the United States to pass a law concerning the operation of autonomous cars. The Nevada law went into effect on March 1, 2012, and the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles issued the first license for a self-driven car in May 2012. The license was issued to a Toyota Prius modified with Google's experimental driverless technology. Three U.S. states have passed laws permitting driverless cars, as of September 2012: Nevada, Florida and California. (video 5 and 6) HISTORY

An early representation of the autonomous car was Norman Bel Geddes's Futurama exhibit sponsored by General Motors at the 1939 World's Fair, which depicted electric cars powered by circuits embedded in the roadway and controlled by radio. In the 1980s, a vision-guided Mercedes-Benz...
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