Future of Crisis Intervention

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Future of Crisis Intervention
Karen Burgess
Mental Health and Crisis Intervention Practices/BSHS 471
January 28, 2013
David Elkins

Abstract
Even though too many volunteers are not good in a crisis intervention, without crisis intervention there would be many people helpless in a crisis because trained professionals and volunteers assist people in crisis and networking and collaboration with other agencies is important. In any crisis, it is better to be proactive than reactive This paper is about future trends in crisis intervention but no one knows what the future holds, especially when there are so many cutbacks in programs. I will explain my opinion about what the future of crisis intervention may be. This paper will show the following topics; the evolution of crisis intervention into a human service subspecialty, roles of volunteers and trained professionals, proactive-preventive models, managed care system impact, networking, and collaboration with other agencies, future trends, and their impact, and involvement of communities. First, the paper will show some important issues in the intervention of crisis.

Future of Crisis Intervention
A crisis intervention is important for people in or has been in a crisis. There are crisis interventions methods used to support an individual for short-term that have experienced a crisis, emotional, and physiological distress. A patient of crisis intervention may not be able to solve problems, function normally, or may need help coping. The human service has many challenges today meeting the patients’ needs. Caring for clients where a crisis has occurred, such as a mental illness, personal loss, or substance abuse issue. Evolution of Crisis Intervention into a human service subspecialty Crisis intervention has evolved into a human service subspecialty to help people who cannot afford high costs for mental health issues. “Caplan’s focus on preventive psychiatry, which attempted early intervention to promote positive growth and minimize the chance of psychological impairment, led to an emphasis on mental health consultation” (Slaikeu, 1990, p. 7) (Kanel, 2003. p. 15). Roles of Volunteers and Trained Professionals

Volunteers are helpful in times of economic failure. “The volunteer worker seems vital,

especially during times of economic downturns” (Kanel, 2003. p. 17). Trained professionals

work to keep mental ill people from not getting the right treatment without higher costs. Trained

professionals should always be the one to give mental health treatment but volunteers free

trained professionals to administer to more serious crisis.

Proactive-preventive Models

There are quite a few proactive-preventive models in crisis intervention and some that will

describe crisis intervention, and they are; humanistic approach, family systems theory, brief

therapy, psychoanalytic theory, cognitive-behavioral theory, and existential theory. The

humanistic approach is about trusting the client to realize the importance of his or her therapy. Humanistic approach is about the whole person not just about the illness. The family systems

theory is about if one family member changes behavior the rest of the family will change

behavior. Brief therapy is about how a clients’ behavior in the past has influenced the current

behavior. The psychoanalytic theory explains how psychic energy can heal in a crisis. The

cognitive-behavioral theory is about “a person’s cognitions, meanings, and perspectives about

the precipitating event is important in the counselor’s determining whether a crisis state

develops” (Kanel, 2003, p. 19). The existential theory is about anxiety is a normal part of

existence, but the anxiety can be self-developed.

Managed Care System

A human service worker can provide a care system plan, and network with other agencies

to do what is in the best interest for the...
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