Future Concerns - 'Gattaca' and 'Fahrenheit 451'

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 551
  • Published : January 17, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Popular fictions texts expressing views of the future educate audiences about current issues and the dystopias that develop from them. Texts such as the film ‘Gattaca’, directed by Andrew Niccol and novel ‘Fahrenheit 451’ by Ray Bradbury explore futuristic societies and the implications that become of their innovation. Although entertaining, texts such as these are didactic and must be taken seriously, as they communicate messages to audiences regarding prevalent concerns and possible futures based on society’s choices. ‘Gattaca’ (1995) directed by Andrew Niccol, follows the story of the underdog Vincent, who is challenged by genetic discrimination against ‘in−valids’ like himself. Through an elaborate identity switch and the help of ‘genetically advantaged’ Jerome, Vincent prevails to achieve his dreams and find his place at Gattaca Space Station. Niccol utilises conventions of film to convey messages to the audience by highlighting issues relevant to the context of production. ‘Gattaca’ incorporates many themes which highlight the corruption and inequality in this strange, new world. Niccol explores concepts such as elitism, perfection, inequity and modernism. This film opens with two contrasting epigraphs, which entices viewers’ interest into moral themes in ‘Gattaca’. The first quote reads: “Consider God’s handiwork; Who can straighten what He hath made crooked?” Ecclesiastes 7.13. An interpretation of this quote is that life is intended to be left alone to take its course, which is contradictory to many ideas in ‘Gattaca’. The quote following reads: “I not only think that we will tamper with Mother Nature, I think Mother wants us to.” Willard Gaylin. This presents audiences with differing opinions to contemplate as they consider what scientific advancements their own future holds, watching Vincent in his. The opening scene is an extreme close up shot of Vincent’s fingernails, hair follicles and loose skin, against a blue cubicle. The extreme close up shot...
tracking img