Function of Art

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  • Topic: The Scream, Edvard Munch, Perception
  • Pages : 1 (367 words )
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  • Published : May 7, 2013
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Function of Art

Intro: Art comes in many forms which include painting, music, photography, theater, printmaking, sculpture, literature, dance, cinema, and architecture. We can explore art by their formal and technical characteristics and how they appeal to our mind. Drawing, painting, photography, cinema, and dance are the different types of art forms that I am generally exposed to. These different types of art mean so many things to different people. It is a way that people can get a message across, an expression for someone’s ideas and people’s heartfelt emotions.

Art is essential to human survival because it provides guidance and support for the mechanism essential to survival: the mind. When a man sees a beautiful picture, hears a lovely symphony, or reads a fascinating novel that agrees with his sense of life, he has the feeling of inspiration. He feels like his values are achievable and within his reach. Conversely, when he sees a disjointed picture, a mélange of discordant sounds, or a tell-all exposé, he feels as if his values are in jeopardy or under siege. Art reaffirms one's values and being. Furthermore, art provides instruction in conceptualization. As I outlined earlier, art gives the viewer the ability to see concepts at a perceptual level. For example, Maxfield Parrish's Contentment presents the concept of friendship that eliminates what is not important and focuses on the mutual benevolence.

It shows men what their world should look like, if the sense of life of the artists matches their own, or what their world should most emphatically not be like, if the senses of life do not match up. For example, in Ecstasy, Maxfield Parrish has depicted a world in which joy is prevalent. He has made a statement about how life should be. I am sure he would not assert that life is rosy all of the time. However, he would say that it should be. On the flip side, Edvard Munch's The Scream presents the world as sheer terror. The subject can do...
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