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Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disasterr

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Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disasterr

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FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NUCLEAR DISASTER
Date: March 11, 2011
Location: Ōkuma, Fukushima, Japan
Construction began: July 25, 1967 (Fukushima I - 1)
Commission date: March 26, 1971 (Fukushima I - 1)
Operator(s): Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO)
Constructor(s): Kajima
Injuries: 37 with physical injuries, 2 workers taken to hospital with radiation burns.

THE POWERPLANT

The Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant also known as Fukushima Dai-ichi (dai-ichi means "number one"), is a disabled nuclear power plant located on a 3.5-square-kilometre (860-acre) site[1] in the towns of Okuma and Futaba in the Futaba District of Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. First commissioned in 1971, the plant consists of six boiling water reactors (BWR). These light water reactors drove electrical generators with a combined power of 4.7 GWe, making Fukushima Daiichi one of the 15 largest nuclear power stations in the world. Fukushima I was the first nuclear plant to be designed, constructed and run in conjunction with General Electric, Boise, and Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO).[3] The plant suffered major damage from the 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that hit Japan on March 11, 2011 and, as of December 2012, is not expected to reopen. The earthquake and tsunami disabled the reactor cooling systems, leading to releases of radioactivity and triggering a 30 km evacuation zone surrounding the plant. On April 20, 2011, the Japanese authorities declared the 20 km evacuation zone a no-go area which may only be entered under government supervision. As of April 2012, Units 1-4 are no longer in operation. Units 2-4 shut down on April 19, 2012, while Unit 1 was the last of these four units to shut down on April 20. The Fukushima II Nuclear Power Plant, or Fukushima Dai-ni ("number two"), is located to the south and also run by TEPCO.

SITE LAYOUT
The location of the plant was on a bluff which was originally 35-meters above sea level. During construction, however, TEPCO lowered the...