Fucking a Slat Cracker

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  • Topic: Traffic sign, Street sign theft, Fucking, Austria
  • Pages : 3 (1224 words )
  • Download(s) : 790
  • Published : November 9, 2010
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It is believed that the settlement was founded around the 6th century by Focko, a Bavarian nobleman. The existence of the village was documented for the first time in 1070 and historical records show that some twenty years later the lord was Adalpertus de Fucingin. The spelling of the name has evolved over the years; it is first recorded in historical sources with the spelling as Vucchingen in 1070, Fukching in 1303,[5] Fugkhing in 1532, and in the modern spelling Fucking in the 18th century,[6] which is pronounced with the vowel oo as in book.[2] The ending -ing is an old Germanic suffix indicating the people belonging to the root word to which it is attached, such as in the English word earthling; thus Fucking means "(place of) Focko’s people."[7] [edit]Demographics and transportation

The Austrian census of 2001 recorded that the village had a population of 93.[8] The Age reported in 2005 that it had 104 people and 32 houses.[6] There is a bus service operated by OÖVV between Schärding and Eggerding which makes stops at Unterfucking (Lower Fucking) and Oberfucking (Upper Fucking). Bus route 2302 operates once a day from Monday to Friday.[9] [edit]Name and notoriety

Fucking's most famous feature is four traffic signs with its name on them, beside which tourists stop to have their photograph taken, owing to the identical spelling to the present participle of the English-language profanity "fuck". One version of the sign features the village name with an additional sign beneath it, with the words "Bitte — nicht so schnell!" ("Please — not so fast!"). The lower sign — which features an illustration of two children — is meant to advise drivers to watch their speed, but tourists see this as a double meaning coupled with the village name.[10] British and American soldiers based in nearby Salzburg noticed the name after World War II, and began to travel to the village to have their photos taken beside the signs while striking various poses. The local residents,...
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