Fruits, Seeds and the Future

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A fruit results from the maturation of one or more flowers. The ovule producing part of the flower forms all or part of the fruit. Inside the ovary/ovaries are one or more small eggs, where the embryo sac contains the egg cell. When the female embryo sac joins with two male sperm these ovules become seeds. (Biology Online, 2005) Each fruit is made of certain acids, vitamins, fructose, proteins, starch, and cellulose. These are mixed together to form certain tastes in fruit. Fruits are not just eaten because they are nutritional, the way they look and taste play a big part in whether they are chosen to be eaten. Each fruit has a different and characteristic taste.  

Some fruits are sweet and some are sour. There are different amounts of compounds in different kinds of fruit. Higher fructose content will make a fruit taste sweeter, while more acids will make a fruit taste sour. When fruit ripens there is less acid but more sugar. Oranges have almost the same amount of fructose and acid so they can taste both sweet and sour. Lemons do not get sweet when they ripen because they have an excessive amount of acids. Two fruits of the same kind can taste different because there may be many varieties of that fruit. There could also be a difference in the soil quality, manure used, climate, water and the way the fruit was grown. Food acids that naturally occur in many fruits are citric acid, malic acid, and tartaric acid. Without these acids fruits may taste bland. (Food Additives, 2010) The longer the time it takes for harvesting of the fruit before it gets eaten could add to a greater loss of flavor. Plants are not able to move from one spot to another on their own. They developed a way to make sure that their seeds are taken far away from them. If seeds start to develop close to the parent plant, the young plant would not receive enough...
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