From Ragtime by E.L.Doctorow

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  • Topic: Black people, Character, E. L. Doctorow
  • Pages : 4 (1576 words )
  • Download(s) : 30
  • Published : May 5, 2013
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The author of the novel “Ragtime” is rather popular American writer Edgar Lawrence Doctorow who was born in the Bronx, New York City. He was the son of second-generation Americans of Russian Jewish descent. He published his first literary effort, The Beetle, in the school literary magazine, Dynamo. Young Edgar described his masterpiece as “a tale of etymological self-defamation inspired by my reading of Kafka”. During all his life he was send to the military service, than had a wife and 3 children and worked as an editor for the most part of his life. And finally left editing in order to write in 1969.Ragtime written in 1975 was named one of the hundred best novels of the 20th century by the Modern Library editorial board.

As it was told in the preface we will learn about the tragedy of the main character's life. Coalhouse Walker Jr. and his beloved woman Sarah are the two to suffer. But as we are allowed to analyze only small part of such a sad novel we will speak about changes. Changes that are supposed to be taken in the personal life of our main character and those changes that have already been taken while the family that saved Sarah got acquainted with the father of her baby. Moreover if we could deep into the final part of the narration we may have an opportunity to watch very difficult and numerous social and political changes in which our characters won't take the last part. Lawrence Doctorow when Negroes were hated and worked hard to receive their own rights to live as a normal members of the society. That's what I've meant under the political and social changes. But personal views of the family I mentioned above became different after several visits of Coalhouse to their place and especially after his amusing play “The piece was brought to a conclusion. Everybody applauded. Mother than introduced Mr Walker to Grandfather and to Younger Brother, who shook the black man's hand and said I am pleased to meet you.”

The narration is from the third...
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