From Mexico Into the Us: Illegal Immigration and Crime

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From Mexico into the US: Illegal Immigration and Crime
English Composition II
Professor John Willey
May 8, 2012


Abstract
The issue of illegal immigration from Mexico and its direct influence on the trafficking of illicit drugs, human cargo, and illegal weapons across the Mexico border were explored and gauged to offer a subjective analysis of the true problem. The objective was to identify the core issues associated with illegal immigration and its association with Mexican Drug Cartels, Gangs, and their use of illegal immigrants to further their goals. The political, social, and economic effects were also examined to gain a more succinct understanding and appreciation of second and third order effects and the influence they maintain on the American culture. Each supplementary effect places an even greater strain on an already overburdened system.  

Professor Willey
English Comp. II
May 8, 2012
From Mexico into the US: Illegal Immigration and Crime
One in six Hispanic males residing in the United States is likely to be incarcerated at some point during his lifetime for offenses ranging from misdemeanor violations to drugs and violent crimes (Bonczar & Beck, 1997). This is a staggering rate considering these totals do not include the myriad of crimes committed by illegal immigrants from Mexico as they are routinely deported for their actions and never face legal action within the U.S. Imagine what the totals would be if they did face American jurors. Imagine the alarming rates at which an already strained prison system would grow. Imagine how truly evident the problems would be if we only had those numbers to complete the reality check of our legal and immigration systems. Illegal immigrants from Mexico don’t always come with the intention to make a better life for themselves and their families like many would have us believe. Not all come to work. Not all come to benefit anyone but themselves and the violent chain of crooks they support and defend. They often bring more than good intentions with them as they cross the Southwestern U.S. border. Ranging from Marijuana and Cocaine to sex slaves and weapons, they transport a plethora of illicit merchandise that lends to the seemingly insurmountable crime problems we see in the news each and every day. In short, illegal immigrants account for a great deal of illegal activity and violent crimes in the U.S. As such, it is overtly evident that illegal immigration from Mexico has increased the flow of illicit drugs, human cargo, and illegal weapons into the United States.

There are many who argue that giving amnesty to the estimated twelve to twenty million illegal immigrants currently residing in the U.S. would go far in curbing this trend (Gheen). This is highly incorrect as there have been seven amnesty periods granted since 1986 with absolutely no downward trend in crimes committed by illegal immigrants from Mexico. Conversely, trends and statistics show otherwise. In modern immigration history, it is demonstrated over and over again that illegal immigrants pose a serious threat to communities across the U.S. The threats are not only in the form of social and economic strains, but go much further to add to an already violent urban environment in major U.S. cities from coast to coast. In Alex Jones online article, 18 Facts Prove Illegal Immigration Is Absolute Nightmare for U.S. Economy (2011), illustrates that most citizens of the U.S. view the illegal immigrants as more than a work force nuisance in that the illegal immigrants take approximately 7.7 million jobs from out of work Americans (Jones, 2011). We see them as an economic burden in that they cost the U.S. Taxpayer $113 billion annually (Illegal Immigration U.S.A, 2011). Although staggering in number, these statistics mask the real costs of illegal immigration from Mexico. They hide the facts that border security costs are into the billions annually and that local governments and economies are on the...
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