Freud's – "If Moses Was an Egyptian" – Response

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  • Topic: Judaism, Jews, Antisemitism
  • Pages : 2 (499 words )
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  • Published : March 8, 2013
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Freud's – "If Moses was an Egyptian" – Response

Freud's "If Moses was an Egyptian" is an obviously different kind of text than his previous ones. The text deals primarily with historical facts, a fact which may lead the readers to wonder whether what they read is indeed an actual Freudian text. However, after reading the third section, the reasons behind the text's occurrence seem to be much clearer to me; there are two particular themes I found most interesting in the text, two themes which seem to eventually connect with each other in addition to one of Freud's claims in the third section. The first is the assumption that Moses does not actually have any speech deficiency, but that he only speaks in a strange way (his accent perhaps) and more slowly than normal, as Hebrew is not his native language (in correlation with Freud's hypothesis that he is Egyptian). The other relates to the fact that the Jewish religion is historically actually dual, while one part of the religion is lead by people who went through traumatic experiences. And finally, the part of the third section where Freud relates to the German invasion and him being forced to leave his own home, which I found particularly interesting - not only because it seems deeply connected with the former two, but also because of Freud's direct reference to the experience of having been personally forced to do something – something highly extreme – leaving his own country and living space. The assumption that Hebrew was not Moses' native language may be compared with the general opposition to Freud's ideas and theory, while they symbolize a different language, foreign to the public's native one. The second assumption may be compared to the actual historical time the text was written – the ongoing Anti-Semitism against the Jews and other minorities; therefore the second assumption may imply that the general population and culture consisting of Germany is not only made of one group but out of many others...
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