Frequency and Volume of Sound Waves Lab Report

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Frequency and Volume of Sound Waves Exp 11.1
Physics
Lab Partners:
1/28/12

Object: To see how wave length, speed, and temperature affect frequency

Supplies:
* 2 six inch pieces of copper pipe and 1 four inch piece * Freezer
* Hot tap water
* Bowl
* Paper towels
Procedure:
1. Hold one of the six inch pieces of pipe in hand and plug the bottom with finger 2. Blow into the pipe until you find the right angle to create a tone 3. Vary the force with which you blow. Note differences in pitch 4. Repeat steps 1-3 with the other piece of 6-inch pipe note any differences 5. Repeat steps 1-3 with the other piece of 4-inch pipe note any differences 6. Place one of the six inch pieces of pipe in freezer

7. Fill the bowl with tap water as hot as you can get
8. Place the other six inch piece of pipe into the bowl
9. After 15 min remove pipe from freezer and blow on it again 10. Quickly remove the pipe from the water and blow on it. 11. Note the difference between the hot and cold pipes

Notes:
4-in has higher pitch and frequency than 6-in
Both 6-in pipes had same pitch and frequency give or take 1-2Hz The warm 6-in had a higher pitch and frequency than the cold 6-in

Summary:
The pitch of sound is not in any way affected by the force of the blow. Pitch is determined by frequency, frequency is determined by the wave length and the speed of sound in the medium which it is traveling. The pitch of the sound produced by the four inch pipe was higher than the pitch produced by the six inch pipe because the wave length is determined by the length of the pipe, longer pipe, longer wavelength, lower frequency. Although the length of the pipes were the same the warm pipe had a higher frequency than the cold pipe, the warm pipe had a higher speed of sound, thus the frequency was higher than the cold pipe because the speed of sound in that pipe was slower.
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