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French Revolution . What were the major cause's effects of the re...

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French Revolution . What were the major cause's effects of the revolution. Who impacted it most greatly.

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French Revolution

The French revolution was ignited by a series of problems that continued to worsen until revolution was necessary. Problems including huge gaps between rich and poor that grew considerably worse under kings Louie XV and Louie XVI. The American Revolution and long wars created economic crisis to spur throughout the country. Royal mismanagement added to the revolt of commoners. Such impediments led to jeopardy of national stability, which soon became disastrous.

As the country began deteriorating, Louis XVI along with Marie Antoinette furthered themselves from the commoners and the gap between rich and poor dramatically increased. Clergy and nobility lived well with little to complain about, while overwhelming numbers of commoners were abused, taxed, and dying. As numbers accumulated among the poor, the people soon retorted out of misery. With circulation of literature and knowledge of the enlightenment, many became defiant. They forced themselves to Louis XVI who replies by creating estates general for equal say between the clergy, nobility, and commoners. This was quick to fail and rioting spread throughout the country. Louis XVI responds by sending the army against the commoners, but with little moral, the army joins the rebel and King Louis XVI has lost control.

Desperate to regain control, Louis XVI declares equal rights among all citizens. People began listening; thinking the King fully heard their complaints. After time with no change among status, an angry mob surrounds the King. Forcing him to sign a new constitution, Heredity titles became outlawed, trials were settled by jury not judge, and the French law became re-configured. Power is put mainly into legislation and restrictions surround the Roman Catholic Church.

The newly overthrown government had room for success yet failed due to poor economy and war status. Unlike the American Revolution, many countries did not support the French during this era, and this change in...