French + Indian War Dbq

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 1010
  • Published : November 7, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
The French and Indian War was a conflict between the French and the British In which the two sides both wanted as much land as they could get in North America. The British and Colonists fought France in North America, but the war was also fought in Europe by only the British. The English were always bartering with Native Americans and trying to get their land. “We know our Lands are now become more valuable. The white people think we do not know their Value; but we are sensible that the Land is everlasting, and the few Goods we receive for it are soon warn out and gone; Canassatego, speech to representatives of Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, 1742” (Document B) This conflict between the English and the Indians sets up the French and Indian alliance in the war. Nine years later, after much bloodshed and many deaths on all sides, the British and the Colonists won the war. In the end, the French and Indian War altered the political, economic, and ideological relations between Britain and its American Colonies in a way in which ultimately led to the American Revolution. The relationship was altered politically due to Britain’s control of the entire eastern coastline, and how they refused to protect anyone who went east of the proclamation line. It was altered economically because of how British policies and taxes after 1763 were designed to raise revenue to pay for the cost of the empire, and ideologically because of the Ideas that the American Colonists had about the British and the Ideas that the British had about the Colonists and how these all changed after the war.

After the war and the Treaty of Paris, there were no more French territories In North America; North America Before 1754 and After 1763 (Document A). This meant that Britain now controlled more land than it did before. The expenses of the land, along with the expenses of the war put the English in a lot of debt. The British Order Council says “We...beg leave humbly to represent your Majesty...
tracking img