Freedom of Information Act

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There is a ministerial veto which undermines the Act. This has been used only twice: the first time to stop publication of minutes of cabinet meetings relating to the invasion of Iraq[9] and the second to stop publication of cabinet meetings relating to discussions regarding devolution.[10] Other criticism:

Companies owned by one public authority are generally subject to the Act but companies owned by two or more public authorities are not covered[11]HYPERLINK \l "cite_note-11"[12] [edit] Facts revealed by the act

Facts that have been brought to light by this Act include:
The Government agreed to a £1.5 million bailout of one of the most troubled schools in its flagship academies programme ten days before the 2005 general election[13] Ministers and MPs claimed thousands of pounds on taxis as part of £5.9 million in expenses for travel[13] Foreign diplomats – who have diplomatic immunity – were accused of rapes, sexual assaults, child abuse and murders while working in Britain[13] Seventy-four police officers serving with the Metropolitan Police have criminal records[13] A clandestine British torture programme existed in post-war Germany, “reminiscent of the concentration camps”[13] The UK supported the Israeli nuclear weapons program, by selling Israel 20 tonnes of heavy water in 1958.[14] The NHS has made available Implanon implants to girls from the age of 13 in an attempt to cut teenage pregnancies[13] [edit] Amendment bill

Main article: Freedom of Information (Amendment) Bill
The Freedom of Information (Amendment) Bill was a private member's bill introduced to the British House of Commons in 2007 which failed to become law. Conservative MP David Maclean introduced the bill to ensure that MPs' correspondence was exempt from freedom of information laws. The then leader of the Liberal Democrats, Sir Menzies Campbell, said there should not "be one law for MPs and a different law for everyone else" and that it looked like "Parliament has something to hide".[15] However, this failed to pass the first reading in the House of Lords. Further to this, Lord Falconer made comments suggesting that time spent deciding whether or not information fell under an exemption clause should be included in the £600 cost limit. Consultation was carried out, with the government saying the change would cut costs and discourage requests for trivial information,[16] although critics said that it was to keep embarrassing information secret.[7]HYPERLINK \l "cite_note-16"[17]HYPERLINK \l "cite_note-17"[18] The Economist contrasted the £12m the changes would have saved to the £555bn of taxpayers' money the government spent in 2006.[7] [edit] See also

Campaign for Freedom of Information
Thirty year rule
[edit] References
^ a b Freedom of Information Act 2000, Section 87
^ "The Freedom of Information Act 2000 (Commencement No. 1) Order 2001". Statutory Instrument. Ministry of Justice. 30 April 2001. pp. SI 2001 No. 1637 (C. 56). http://www.statutelaw.gov.uk/content.aspx?ActiveTextDocId=2517935. Retrieved 2008-09-07. ^ a b c "The Freedom of Information Act 2000 (Commencement No. 2) Order 2002". Statutory Instrument. Ministry of Justice. 12 November 2002. pp. SI 2002 No. 2812 (C. 86). http://www.statutelaw.gov.uk/content.aspx?ActiveTextDocId=43748. Retrieved 2008-09-07. ^ a b c "The Freedom of Information Act 2000 (Commencement No. 3) Order 2003". Statutory Instrument. Ministry of Justice. 8 October 2003. pp. SI 2003 No. 2603 (C.97). http://www.statutelaw.gov.uk/content.aspx?ActiveTextDocId=861130. Retrieved 2008-09-07. ^ a b "The Freedom of Information Act 2000 (Commencement No. 4) Order 2004". Statutory Instrument. Ministry of Justice. 20 July 2004. pp. SI 2004 No. 1909 (C.81). http://www.statutelaw.gov.uk/content.aspx?ActiveTextDocId=927251. Retrieved 2008-09-07. ^ a b "The Freedom of Information Act 2000 (Commencement No. 5) Order 2004". Statutory Instrument. Ministry of Justice. 26 November 2004. pp. SI 2004 No. 3122 (C. 131)....
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