Free Research Paper Example

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 848
  • Published : February 26, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Interaction: Environment and organism
Table of Contents:
I. INTEGRATED SCIENCE
II. COURSE PAPER: CASE STUDY
III. SOURCE/REFERENCES
IV. CONTENT
A. BRIEF PRESENTATION OF THE CASE
B. POINT OF VIEW

I. INTEGRATED SCIENCE(Interaction: Environment and organism) II. COURSE PAPER: CASE STUDY

Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a wide range of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals. Bacteria were among the first life forms to appear onEarth, and are present in most habitats on the planet, growing in soil, water, acidic hot springs, radioactive waste, and deep in the Earth's crust, as well as in organic matter and the live bodies of plants and animals, providing outstanding examples of mutualism in the digestive tracts of humans, termites and cockroaches. On February 6, 2013, scientists reported that bacteria were found living in the cold and dark in a lake buried a half-mile deep under the ice in Antarctica. There are typically 40 million bacterial cells in a gram of soil and a million bacterial cells in a millilitre of fresh water; in all, there are approximately five nonillion (5×1030) bacteria on Earth, forming a biomass that exceeds that of all plants and animals. Bacteria are vital in recycling nutrients, with many steps in nutrient cycles depending on these organisms, such as the fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere andputrefaction. In the biological communities surrounding hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, bacteria provide the nutrients needed to sustain life by converting dissolved compounds such as hydrogen sulphide and methane. Most bacteria have not been characterised, and only about half of the phyla of bacteria have species that can be grown in the laboratory. The study of bacteria is known as bacteriology, a branch ofmicrobiology. Most bacteria secrete a covering for themselves which we call a cell wall, However, bacterial cell walls are a totally...
tracking img